ifolder access over public and private networks

Is it possible to set up an ifolder server to be accessible by a private
network and a public network at the same time?

I have 2 separate private networks that I would like to be able to share
files between. One private network already has a working ifolder setup.
Both my Windows clients and my openSUSE clients are working well with
it. :)

I would like to be able to configure this ifolder server to also be
accessible to the other private network.

Thanks,

Nathan
0
Nathan
6/27/2007 4:32:36 PM
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In article <Diwgi.100$8i6.25@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com>, Nathan Ogden 
wrote:
> s it possible to set up an ifolder server to be accessible by a private
> network and a public network at the same time?

Yes, I do this all the time.
> 
> I have 2 separate private networks that I would like to be able to share
> files between. One private network already has a working ifolder setup.
> Both my Windows clients and my openSUSE clients are working well with
> it. :)

Ok.
> 
> I would like to be able to configure this ifolder server to also be
> accessible to the other private network.

Well, it's no more difficult than making the data accessible on some IP 
address that the clients can route to.

I'm not clear if there are two private networks internal to the iFolder 
server, or if one of the private networks is somewhere out on the 
Internet.

If you need to connect to an iFolder server from the Internet, you need 
to:
a) have iFolder running on a server with an internet connection (like a 
BorderManager server), or
b) have iFolder running on some internal server, and have static NAT or 
port forwarding of port 80 on some public IP address to the internal 
address.

Typically when you need to have iFolder accessible from the Internet, you 
want to configure it to use a URL instead of an IP address.  Then you need 
to have an internal DNS server (unless you want to use HOSTS files) 
resolving that URL to an internal address, and a public DNS server 
resolving the URL to the public address.

Craig Johnson
Novell Support Connection SysOp

0
Craig
6/28/2007 4:25:56 AM
Craig Johnson wrote:

> I'm not clear if there are two private networks internal to the iFolder
> server, or if one of the private networks is somewhere out on the
> Internet.

One of the private networks would have to be accessed through the internet.

> If you need to connect to an iFolder server from the Internet, you need
> to:
> a) have iFolder running on a server with an internet connection (like a
> BorderManager server), or
> b) have iFolder running on some internal server, and have static NAT or
> port forwarding of port 80 on some public IP address to the internal
> address.

I'm unfamiliar with setting up public IP addresses. How do I obtain a public
IP address?

Thank you for the help,

Nathan
0
Nathan
6/28/2007 12:24:55 PM
Craig Johnson wrote:

> Typically when you need to have iFolder accessible from the Internet, you
> want to configure it to use a URL instead of an IP address.  Then you need
> to have an internal DNS server (unless you want to use HOSTS files)
> resolving that URL to an internal address, and a public DNS server
> resolving the URL to the public address.

I found a website (showmyip.com) that offered "Super Dynamic DNS" services.
Would having a dynamic DNS capability like this be good in this situation
on the public ip address side?

Thanks,

Nathan
0
Nathan
6/28/2007 5:01:02 PM
Nathan Ogden wrote:

> I'm unfamiliar with setting up public IP addresses. How do I obtain a
> public IP address?

I learned that I can find out what my router's public ip address is through
a site called showmyip.com. Can I use this ip address as my public ip
address?

Thanks,

Nathan
0
Nathan
6/28/2007 5:03:21 PM
You should be able to use a dynamic DNS entry.

The idea is this:  The web server is set up to listen on/redirect to a 
URL (instead of an IP address).  That way, if you get redirected (to 
x/servlet/webacc, for instance), the redirection would not push a fixed 
IP address to the browser (which would break the public side connection 
if the address being pushed was the server's private address).

As long as the browser picks up a URL, and the URL resolves to the 
correct public IP address of the WebAccess server, it should be fine.  
If you have a DHCP-delivered public address that changes periodically, 
and dynamic DNS is being used, it still works.  (As long as the PC has 
not cached the old address, which it might for a short while).

Craig Johnson
Novell Support Connection SysOp

0
Craig
6/30/2007 7:12:25 PM
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