System Files and Spaces Between Characters

Why is it so common for various system and program files to have some human-readable
text, albeit with a space between each character (and two between each word)?

--
tbl
0
tbl
1/18/2013 6:07:27 PM
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On 1/18/2013 1:07 PM, tbl wrote:
> Why is it so common for various system and program files to have some human-readable
> text, albeit with a space between each character (and two between each word)?
>
> --
> tbl
>

It's all just a conspiracy to make us type \ or \ \ to deal with spaces 
on a linux command line.
0
Travis
1/18/2013 6:10:47 PM
On 1/18/2013 1:07 PM, tbl wrote:
> Why is it so common for various system and program files to have some human-readable
> text, albeit with a space between each character (and two between each word)?
> 
> --
> tbl
> 

I'll venture a guess and say that it likely dates to early days of type
setting and mostly developed over time by convention; similar to today's
protocols. Any form of communication, written, spoken, electronic or
otherwise, requires predefined structure and form to be commonly
accepted and equally understood by all parties.

The spacing between letters is actually not equal, but proportionally
assigned and specifically tailored to each character, much like
typewriter keys were designed. Case and space, watch words of all print
media.

my 2 pennies,

-- 
Digger
Bob O'Dell


0
Digger
1/18/2013 6:22:43 PM
"tbl" <> escribi� en el mensaje
news:[email protected]
> Why is it so common for various system and program files to have some
> human-readable
> text, albeit with a space between each character (and two between each
> word)?

    Do you refer to human-readable text strings inside .exe or .dll files?
(Let's suppose a Windows executable file, but it's the same for Linux)

    That text you see are usually text strings used in the program. Maybe
used in windows that appear in some cases... For example, I just got the
"notepad.exe" file from Windows 98. If I open it with a text editor, I can
see strings like: "F i l e  % %  a l r e a d y  e x i s t s .  D o  y o u  w
i s h  t o  o v e r w r i t e  i t ?" That string is used in the Notepad's
window that ask you if you want to overwrite an existing file if you're
trying to save your current one using a filename already in use. The spaces
between characters are probably there because the strings are unicode
strings, and they use two bytes for each character, but the text editor is
showing them as non-unicode strings (not to blame the text editor, because
this was not a text file in the first place...). If I open the "notepad.exe"
file from Windows 3.11, the strings don't have the spaces between each
character.

    Some other text strings are related to Windows functions (or other dll
functions......) the program uses. In the same "notepad.exe" file from
Windows 98 you can see strings like "GetSaveFileName" (function to show a
Windows save file dialog and get the filename the user is expected to
type...), "RegQueryValueEx" (function to get the data from a value in the
Windows registry...), and many others.

    Hope that helps :)



0
MiguelMS
1/18/2013 7:09:00 PM
My keylogger reports, tbl <[email protected]>, to have written:

>Why is it so common for various system and program files to have some human-readable
>text, albeit with a space between each character (and two between each word)?

Because otherwise 
a lowercase 'c' to the left of 
a lowercase 'l' looks like 
a lowercase 'd' 
(in DOS of course)
0
Bazza
1/19/2013 1:23:43 AM
On Fri, 18 Jan 2013 20:09:00 +0100, "MiguelMS"
<mmollejo%%@%%hotmail.com> wrote:

>"tbl" <> escribi� en el mensaje
>news:[email protected]
>> Why is it so common for various system and program files to have some
>> human-readable
>> text, albeit with a space between each character (and two between each
>> word)?
>
>    Do you refer to human-readable text strings inside .exe or .dll files?
>(Let's suppose a Windows executable file, but it's the same for Linux)
>
>    That text you see are usually text strings used in the program. Maybe
>used in windows that appear in some cases... For example, I just got the
>"notepad.exe" file from Windows 98. If I open it with a text editor, I can
>see strings like: "F i l e  % %  a l r e a d y  e x i s t s .  D o  y o u  w
>i s h  t o  o v e r w r i t e  i t ?"

I think you'll find that those strings are in UTF-16 where each
character is stored in two bytes.
-- 
Roger
0
Roger
1/19/2013 8:46:30 AM
> Why is it so common for various system and program files to have some
> human-readable text, albeit with a space between each character (and
> two between each word)?

Lemme guess, you're referring to text found inside "binary files",
aren't you ?

If so, then you may probably want to google for "unicode"

0
ObiWan
1/21/2013 2:17:45 PM
On Mon, 21 Jan 2013 15:17:45 +0100, ObiWan <[email protected]> wrote:

> 
> > Why is it so common for various system and program files to have some
> > human-readable text, albeit with a space between each character (and
> > two between each word)?
> 
> Lemme guess, you're referring to text found inside "binary files",
> aren't you ?
> 
> If so, then you may probably want to google for "unicode"

I suppose so.  One recent example would be MSVCP100.dll.  SAS flagged it as some sort
of vundo malware.  Others have been *.cfg, some with no extension, some with other
extensions.  I've bee curious about it for decades.

As you can probably work out quite easily, I'm not a programmer.  Monkeys at
keyboards would certainly turn out copies of many great works long before I could
become proficient in a computer language.

-- 
tbl
0
tbl
1/21/2013 6:48:55 PM
On 1/21/2013 1:48 PM, tbl wrote:
> On Mon, 21 Jan 2013 15:17:45 +0100, ObiWan <[email protected]> wrote:
> 
>>
>>> Why is it so common for various system and program files to have some
>>> human-readable text, albeit with a space between each character (and
>>> two between each word)?
>>
>> Lemme guess, you're referring to text found inside "binary files",
>> aren't you ?
>>
>> If so, then you may probably want to google for "unicode"
> 
> I suppose so.  One recent example would be MSVCP100.dll.  SAS flagged it as some sort
> of vundo malware.  Others have been *.cfg, some with no extension, some with other
> extensions.  I've bee curious about it for decades.
> 
> As you can probably work out quite easily, I'm not a programmer.  Monkeys at
> keyboards would certainly turn out copies of many great works long before I could
> become proficient in a computer language.
> 

Good call Obiwan,

I went someplace else entirely. Didn't read it slow enough to realize
the op was referring to embedded ASCII. After reading this reply,
everything is clear now. Hmmm..., now where did I put those damn bifocals?

Sorry for being so far off track,

-- 
Digger
Bob O'Dell


0
Digger
1/21/2013 9:18:18 PM
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