Symantec labels China censor-busting software as Trojan

Symantec has labelled a program that enables Chinese surfers to view blocked 
websites as a Trojan Horse. Upshot? Users of Norton Anti-Virus cannot access 
Freegate, a popular program which circumvents government blocks, the FT 
reports.

Freegate has 200,000 users, Dynamic Internet Technology (DIT), its 
developer, estimates.

A Symantec staffer in China told the FT that Norton Anti-Virus identified 
Freegate as a Trojan horse, but declined to provide a rationale for such a 
definition. The absence of an explanation from Symantec raises concerns. We 
hope that the mislabelling of Freegate is a simple mistake, soon rectified, 
rather than yet another example of an IT firm helping Beijing implement 
restrictions.

Complete article - 
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/09/14/symantec_targets_freegate/


-- 
Don

Track or post software updates in http://cou.dozleng.com 
0
Don
9/14/2004 7:40:00 PM
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Don wrote:

> Symantec has labelled a program that enables Chinese surfers to view blocked 
> websites as a Trojan Horse. Upshot? Users of Norton Anti-Virus cannot access 
> Freegate, a popular program which circumvents government blocks, the FT 
> reports.
> 
> Freegate has 200,000 users, Dynamic Internet Technology (DIT), its 
> developer, estimates.
<snip>
> Complete article - 
> http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/09/14/symantec_targets_freegate/


Something interesting is going on here, just not sure what yet. Found 
this old article on the Dynamic Internet Technology(DIT)website, the 
developers of Freegate.

September 18, 2002 - DIT was quoted by Doug Nairne on "South China 
Morning Post [Premium]":

Bill Dong, a spokesman for Dynamic Internet Technology, a company 
providing technical services to Voice of America's Chinese-language Web 
site, said the attacks started at the end of April, around the same time 
the Minister for Public Security, Jia Chunwang, urged mainland law 
enforcers to be more aggressive in fighting hostile foreign forces 
subverting China via the Internet.

"We believe the viruses were specially created as an organised massive 
attack," he said.

Mr Dong said the viruses were mainly targeting well-known e-mail 
addresses for Falun Gong Web sites, banned news sites and technology 
sites set up to penetrate the information blockade in China such as 
freenet-china.org. They have also been sent to mailing lists and a wide 
range of groups Beijing considers subversive, including Chinese 
dissidents and Xinjiang independence activists.

Evidently DIT is working with the US government on these projects:

In February 2002, DIT started a pilot project with US government. In May 
2002, this project was extended for one year. On March 4, 2002, DIT 
published DynaWeb with Epochtimes to provide web access to forbidden 
sites for Internet users in China.

Then this:
http://policy.house.gov/html/news_item.cfm?id=112
0
Will
9/14/2004 9:11:00 PM
Don wrote:
> Symantec has labelled a program that enables Chinese surfers to view blocked 
> websites as a Trojan Horse. Upshot? Users of Norton Anti-Virus cannot access 
> Freegate, a popular program which circumvents government blocks, the FT 
> reports.

This is hardly suprising considering Chinas position on any thing
remotely involving freemdon of speech (or thought) . you don't think
symantec is going to risk losing any money do you ? they could care
less about how there 'product' is used , China told them to jump and 
they asked "how high" the same as any company trying to set up shop
there.

-- 
0
Wolfen
9/14/2004 10:45:00 PM
Kerry wants to know
> Wolfen wrote:
> 
>> China told them to jump and they asked "how high"
> 
> 
> Do you know this for a fact or are you just speculating? 

ANYthing involving "state security" (which is how they look at
this type of thing )is done their way or the highway ,(or maybe
a cold dark prison cell before you're shot thru the head ) if china
"ask" you to do something and you want to keep doing bussiness
there then you better do it .Quick. they want all the technology they
can get to use against there own people first , then us.
0
Wolfen
9/14/2004 11:43:00 PM
Wolfen wrote:

> China told them to jump and they asked "how high"

Do you know this for a fact or are you just speculating?
0
Kerry
9/14/2004 11:57:00 PM
"Wolfen" <Wolfen@susageeggsusageandnospam.net> wrote in message
news:ci839k$1f5$1@news.grc.com...
> Kerry wants to know
> > Wolfen wrote:
> >
> >> China told them to jump and they asked "how high"
> >
> >
> > Do you know this for a fact or are you just speculating?
>
> ANYthing involving "state security" (which is how they look at
> this type of thing )is done their way or the highway ,(or maybe
> a cold dark prison cell before you're shot thru the head ) if china
> "ask" you to do something and you want to keep doing bussiness
> there then you better do it .Quick. they want all the technology they
> can get to use against there own people first , then us.

I'm sure you can find some links that reflect what you say?

-- 
Robert
GRC Newsgroups/Guidelines/No Regrets
http://news.grc.com/news.exe?cmd=article&group=grc.techtalk&item=116183
0
Robert
9/15/2004 1:58:00 PM
Wolfen wrote:

> Kerry wants to know
> 
>> Wolfen wrote:
>>
>>> China told them to jump and they asked "how high"
>>
>>
>>
>> Do you know this for a fact or are you just speculating? 
> 
> 
> ANYthing involving "state security" (which is how they look at
> this type of thing )is done their way or the highway ,(or maybe
> a cold dark prison cell before you're shot thru the head ) if china
> "ask" you to do something and you want to keep doing bussiness
> there then you better do it .Quick. they want all the technology they
> can get to use against there own people first , then us.

So anything you can imagine is a fact? I don't see anything to connect 
your very active imagination with anything supportable beyond mere 
speculation.

A few IMHOs or IMNSHOs or even an IMO would satisfy me regarding your 
post. Not that there's any reason you need to satify me of course, I 
didn't mean to imply that. The absence of such (IMO, etc.) is what 
disturbs me and is what motivated my reply.
0
Kerry
9/15/2004 3:49:00 PM
Robert wrote:
>>Kerry wants to know
>>
>>>> > Wolfen wrote:
>>>> >
>>>
>>>>> >> China told them to jump and they asked "how high"
>>>
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > Do you know this for a fact or are you just speculating?
>>
>>>
>>> ANYthing involving "state security" (which is how they look at
>>> this type of thing )is done their way or the highway ,(or maybe
>>> a cold dark prison cell before you're shot thru the head ) if china
>>> "ask" you to do something and you want to keep doing bussiness
>>> there then you better do it .Quick. they want all the technology they
>>> can get to use against there own people first , then us.
> 
> 
> I'm sure you can find some links that reflect what you say?

Well,Well,Well, Isn't this a fine can of worms? :-)
I'm sure anything I say from here out will make me
sound like a spokesman for the John Birch Society
and this is getting to be in the realm of political
ideology and has no business here.
I'm sorry to sound like I imply that symantec is anything
but 'Honorable' in keeping the wishes of their "customer"
just the word "China" tends to push all my buttons
these days. Allow me to "rant" by link , read if you want
all of it is somewhat off topic (no symantec)
but is computer/software relevant
I'll shutup now :-)

http://www.ciol.com/content/news/2004/104090901.asp
  http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20040831/0950238_F.shtml
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/world/2004-09-09-asia-opens-up_x.htm?POE=TECISVA
http://www.journalism.co.uk/news/story1052.shtml
http://www.religionnewsblog.com/1299-_China_accused_of_jailing_net_users.html
http://research.yale.edu/lawmeme/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=966
http://www.legacee.com/Culture/CultureOverview.html

-- 
What do they call their "good dishes" in China ?
0
Wolfen
9/15/2004 5:00:00 PM
Wolfen wrote:

> Robert wrote:
> 
>>> Kerry wants to know
>>>
>>>>> >
>>>>> > Do you know this for a fact or are you just speculating?
>>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>> ... if china
>>>> "ask" you to do something and you want to keep doing bussiness
>>>> there then you better do it .Quick. they want all the technology they
>>>> can get to use against there own people first , then us.

>>
>> I'm sure you can find some links that reflect what you say?
> 
> 
> ...
> I'm sorry to sound like I imply that symantec is anything
> but 'Honorable' in keeping the wishes of their "customer"
> just the word "China" tends to push all my buttons
> these days. Allow me to "rant" by link , read if you want
> all of it is somewhat off topic (no symantec)
> but is computer/software relevant

Then I'll accept that you were speculating about Symantec and expressing 
an opinion that you are unable to support with facts.

A simple "IMO" would have sufficed.
0
Kerry
9/15/2004 6:42:00 PM
Kerry wrote:
> 
> Then I'll accept that you were speculating about Symantec and expressing an opinion that you are unable to support with facts. 

Sorry , thats corruct, Subtle nuance does not carry over in "plain text"
very well now does it? , plus the infusion of "aolspeak" IMO is CTSTL 
(confusing to say the least :-) since I don't do the IM thing. not that
there is anything wrong with that AFAICT :-)

-- 
Well,he certinly looks well for have fallen down a well.
0
I
9/15/2004 8:19:00 PM
On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 08:58:52 -0500, "Robert  Wycoff"
<rwycoff@127.0.0.1> wrote:

>> ANYthing involving "state security" (which is how they look at
>> this type of thing )is done their way or the highway ,(or maybe
>> a cold dark prison cell before you're shot thru the head ) if china
>> "ask" you to do something and you want to keep doing bussiness
>> there then you better do it .Quick. they want all the technology they
>> can get to use against there own people first , then us.
>
>I'm sure you can find some links that reflect what you say?

Um . . . how about today's New York Times, in which Mr. Hu says that
China only needs one party, and that the party can police itself?

If you can read this without realizing what is at stake and what is
going on, well . . . I give up.  <g>

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/16/international/asia/16china.html

Yuki
0
Yuki
9/16/2004 11:56:00 AM
Yuki wrote:

> Um . . . how about today's New York Times, in which Mr. Hu says that
> China only needs one party, and that the party can police itself?

Although not evident from your quoting, the discussion is about whether 
or not China carries enough weight with Symantec to get them to declare 
a piece of software as "malware" just because China doesn't want its 
citizens using it.

We care about whether the Chinese people are free but that's a political 
topic, not a technical topic.

Did China put the fix in with Symantec? That is the question.
0
Kerry
9/16/2004 3:58:00 PM
Konichiwa Yuki, You said:
> Um . . . how about today's New York Times, in which Mr. Hu says that
> China only needs one party, and that the party can police itself?

couldn't read the article (not registered ,but I may)
But, any "party" where they tell you to have fun or else
can't be good.

-- 
yeah, I know , I'll shut up now :-)
0
Wolfen
9/16/2004 7:59:00 PM
Reply:

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