Thunderbird gmail password prompt

Hi All,

I just converted my pop3 gmail account to imap.

The first time I log in, I get a little google widows that asks
for my user name and password.  Then it asks me if I want to
allow Thunderbird.

    If I say yes, the I get an "oauth" entry in my saved passwords.  If 
I delete this I go through the same rigmarole

    Is there any way to get Thunderbird to just ask for my stupid 
password the way it does for all my other non-gmail accounts?


Many thanks,
-T
0
T
11/11/2017 3:58:01 AM
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On 11/11/17 4:58 AM, T wrote:
> Hi All,
> 
> I just converted my pop3 gmail account to imap.
> 
> The first time I log in, I get a little google widows that asks
> for my user name and password.  Then it asks me if I want to
> allow Thunderbird.
> 
>    If I say yes, the I get an "oauth" entry in my saved passwords.  If I
> delete this I go through the same rigmarole
> 
>    Is there any way to get Thunderbird to just ask for my stupid
> password the way it does for all my other non-gmail accounts?
> 
> 
> Many thanks,
> -T

There is, but then Google lets you jump through other hoops.
Therefore OAuth2 authentication is the recommended method for Gmail IMAP
and Gmail SMTP.
What's wrong with it?
0
Christian
11/11/2017 6:38:15 AM
On 11/10/2017 10:38 PM, Christian Riechers wrote:
> On 11/11/17 4:58 AM, T wrote:
>> Hi All,
>>
>> I just converted my pop3 gmail account to imap.
>>
>> The first time I log in, I get a little google widows that asks
>> for my user name and password.  Then it asks me if I want to
>> allow Thunderbird.
>>
>>     If I say yes, the I get an "oauth" entry in my saved passwords.  If I
>> delete this I go through the same rigmarole
>>
>>     Is there any way to get Thunderbird to just ask for my stupid
>> password the way it does for all my other non-gmail accounts?
>>
>>
>> Many thanks,
>> -T
> 
> There is, but then Google lets you jump through other hoops.
> Therefore OAuth2 authentication is the recommended method for Gmail IMAP
> and Gmail SMTP.
> What's wrong with it?
> 

Thank you for the explanation!

Oh, I have to use a few of my gmail account on the road and I
don't want to forget my password, so typing it into my
office computer every morning keeps my memory fresh.

The oauth method is a little more of a pain in the ass
than I want to go through, especially since it remembers
the password afterwards and would have to delete it every time.

Why am I writing you?  Who are you again?  YOU KIDS
GET OFF MY LAWN!  Is Teddy still president? I have
a lawn?  I hate when this happens.

:-)
0
T
11/11/2017 7:31:21 AM
On 11/11/17 8:31 AM, T wrote:
> On 11/10/2017 10:38 PM, Christian Riechers wrote:
>> On 11/11/17 4:58 AM, T wrote:
>>> Hi All,
>>>
>>> I just converted my pop3 gmail account to imap.
>>>
>>> The first time I log in, I get a little google widows that asks
>>> for my user name and password.  Then it asks me if I want to
>>> allow Thunderbird.
>>>
>>>     If I say yes, the I get an "oauth" entry in my saved passwords. 
>>> If I
>>> delete this I go through the same rigmarole
>>>
>>>     Is there any way to get Thunderbird to just ask for my stupid
>>> password the way it does for all my other non-gmail accounts?
>>>
>>>
>>> Many thanks,
>>> -T
>>
>> There is, but then Google lets you jump through other hoops.
>> Therefore OAuth2 authentication is the recommended method for Gmail IMAP
>> and Gmail SMTP.
>> What's wrong with it?
> 
> Thank you for the explanation!
> 
> Oh, I have to use a few of my gmail account on the road and I
> don't want to forget my password, so typing it into my
> office computer every morning keeps my memory fresh.
> 
> The oauth method is a little more of a pain in the ass
> than I want to go through, especially since it remembers
> the password afterwards and would have to delete it every time.

Technically what's being remembered is an authentication token, not the
actual password.
That's one of the benefits of using OAuth2 authentication, the password
isn't stored on your computer anymore.

When having to type the password every time it's needed, my best guess
is your password isn't a very strong one. If so, that's bad.
A random password with sufficient length generated by a password manager
is considered secure.
The flip side is, such a password is pretty hard to remember. But
there's no real need to know the actual password. All you need to
remember is the master password for the password safe. This will also
keep your memory fresh, as it will be required more frequently.
0
Christian
11/11/2017 2:51:02 PM
On 11/11/2017 06:51 AM, Christian Riechers wrote:
> When having to type the password every time it's needed, my best guess
> is your password isn't a very strong one.

It is extremely strong.  Nasty (difficult, not rude) would be a
better description.  That is why I am afraid if I don't constantly
use it, I will forget it.  I do have to use this password at
customer sites occasionally.

Password on my own computer start with an extremely strong full
hard drive encryption and then proceed from there.  There
are a few weak passwords, but they are only to satisfy some
local requirement for a password where I don't care anyway.
NOTHING on the Internet is a weak password.


0
T
11/11/2017 8:46:06 PM
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