Insert a PDF into the body of an email?

Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?

Thanks.
0
Cy
1/3/2018 11:05:43 PM
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Cy Burnot <cy.burnot@invalid.com> Wrote in message:
> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
> 
> Thanks.
> 


Probably not as you want to do it. 

Two choices:

A) Copy and paste content from the original pdf document. The
 document or your pdf viewer may prevent this. The copied text
 may require some repair work as it doesn't always copy in a clean
 fashion. 
 
B) Attach the pdf to your email message. You may be able to trim
 the original document down to just the page you want.
 

Not all pdfs are equal. They can be locked to prevent copy and
 paste, or even printing. If the original document was scanned,
 then it is one big graphic and all you can do is take a
 screenshot, or maybe view it in a graphics program and use that
 to grab a copy of the content. If you're lucky, it might be
 possible to extract textual content by use of an OCR tool.
 

-- 
Chris 
0
Chris
1/3/2018 11:38:26 PM
On 1/3/2018 3:05 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
> 
> Thanks.
> 

Please explain why you want to do this?  What do you really want to
accomplish?  There might be alternative ways to do what you want.

-- 
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

President Trump:  Please stop using Twitter.  We need
to hear your voice and see you talking.  We need to know
when your message is really your own and not your attorney's.
0
David
1/4/2018 12:02:38 AM
Chris wrote on 1/3/2018 6:38 PM:
> Cy Burnot <cy.burnot@invalid.com> Wrote in message:
>> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
>> 
>> Thanks.
>> 
> 
> 
> Probably not as you want to do it. 
> 
> Two choices:
> 
> A) Copy and paste content from the original pdf document. The
>  document or your pdf viewer may prevent this. The copied text
>  may require some repair work as it doesn't always copy in a clean
>  fashion. 
>  
> B) Attach the pdf to your email message. You may be able to trim
>  the original document down to just the page you want.
>  
> 
> Not all pdfs are equal. They can be locked to prevent copy and
>  paste, or even printing. If the original document was scanned,
>  then it is one big graphic and all you can do is take a
>  screenshot, or maybe view it in a graphics program and use that
>  to grab a copy of the content. If you're lucky, it might be
>  possible to extract textual content by use of an OCR tool.

I understand you to be saying, "No".


However, a better work-around is to convert the PDF to an image and then
insert the image.

0
Cy
1/4/2018 12:11:07 AM
David E. Ross wrote on 1/3/2018 7:02 PM:
> On 1/3/2018 3:05 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
>> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
>> 
>> Thanks.
>> 
> 
> Please explain why you want to do this?  What do you really want to
> accomplish?  There might be alternative ways to do what you want.
> 

My wife wants to send out a newsletter that (a) is not an attachment and
(b) is visible in the body of an email.
0
Cy
1/4/2018 12:47:05 AM
On 1/3/2018 4:47 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
> David E. Ross wrote on 1/3/2018 7:02 PM:
>> On 1/3/2018 3:05 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
>>> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
>>>
>>> Thanks.
>>>
>>
>> Please explain why you want to do this?  What do you really want to
>> accomplish?  There might be alternative ways to do what you want.
>>
> 
> My wife wants to send out a newsletter that (a) is not an attachment and
> (b) is visible in the body of an email.
> 

See my <http://www.rossde.com/internet/newsletters.html>.

-- 
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

President Trump:  Please stop using Twitter.  We need
to hear your voice and see you talking.  We need to know
when your message is really your own and not your attorney's.
0
David
1/4/2018 3:31:55 AM
Cy Burnot <cy.burnot@invalid.com> Wrote in message:
> David E. Ross wrote on 1/3/2018 7:02 PM:
>> On 1/3/2018 3:05 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
>>> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
>>> 
>>> Thanks.
>>> 
>> 
>> Please explain why you want to do this?  What do you really want to
>> accomplish?  There might be alternative ways to do what you want.
>> 
> 
> My wife wants to send out a newsletter that (a) is not an attachment and
> (b) is visible in the body of an email.
> 
You could do it by converting the pdf to html and sending an html
 email. Maybe whatever produced the pdf could produce html at the
 same time - Open/Libre Office can.

But it just seems like a bad idea to me. The html will not look
 the same to everyone like the pdf will. Different devices,
 display sizes, fonts, .... And if they want to print
 it?

Send a summary or contents list in the email and a link to where
 they can download it.
-- 
(Remove numerics from my email address)
0
Dave
1/4/2018 8:44:02 AM
On 2018-01-04 00:11, Cy Burnot wrote:
> Chris wrote on 1/3/2018 6:38 PM:
>> Cy Burnot <cy.burnot@invalid.com> Wrote in message:
>>> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
>>>
>>> Thanks.
>>>
>>> Probably not as you want to do it. 
> I understand you to be saying, "No".
>
> However, a better work-around is to convert the PDF to an image and then
> insert the image.
"Better"? I don't think so. I am with David Ross on this one. PDF is a
wrapper for content and inherently a poor fit to email and web browsing.
-- 
Chris
0
Chris
1/4/2018 8:44:44 AM
On 2018-01-04 08:44, Dave Royal wrote:
> Cy Burnot <cy.burnot@invalid.com> Wrote in message:
>> My wife wants to send out a newsletter that (a) is not an attachment and
>> (b) is visible in the body of an email.
> You could do it by converting the pdf to html and sending an html
>  email. Maybe whatever produced the pdf could produce html at the
>  same time - Open/Libre Office can. 
I have made the assumption that since the question is being asked, the
original content ("source") of the pdf document is not available.
> But it just seems like a bad idea to me. The html will not look
>  the same to everyone like the pdf will. Different devices,
>  display sizes, fonts, .... And if they want to print
>  it?
>
> Send a summary or contents list in the email and a link to where
>  they can download it.
+1.
-- 
Chris
0
Chris
1/4/2018 8:50:01 AM
On 1/3/2018 10:31 PM, David E. Ross wrote:
> On 1/3/2018 4:47 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
>> David E. Ross wrote on 1/3/2018 7:02 PM:
>>> On 1/3/2018 3:05 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
>>>> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Please explain why you want to do this?  What do you really want to
>>> accomplish?  There might be alternative ways to do what you want.
>>>
>>
>> My wife wants to send out a newsletter that (a) is not an attachment and
>> (b) is visible in the body of an email.
>>
> 
> See my <http://www.rossde.com/internet/newsletters.html>.
> 
I have some comments on your attachment.  First: it was written over 7 
years ago, and computers, storage space, and browser have improved 
significantly over the past 7 years.  At that time my best computer had 
a dual core 1.3 GHz processor and 1 GB of ram.

Two:  In the article it states that PDF are hard to navigate, personally 
I do not find this to be the case.  With things like Comments, Loupe, 
etc. I find PDF the best format to navigate any thing but a one page 
document.
0
Keith
1/4/2018 1:17:42 PM
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------040809070600070908000004
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

On 03/01/2018 23:05, Cy Burnot wrote:
> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
>
> Thanks.

If she knows something about HTML then she might have some success in 
doing this.  However, the best way to distribute a pdf file is by 
attachment as suggested by other posters but there is a better way of 
distributing it and that is by displaying the pdf file on her own 
website and sending a link to her members.  To see how this can be done, 
I suggest look at this website:

<https://msu.edu/~urban/sme865/resources/embedded_pdf.html>

She needs to have a web-host that allows her to upload a pdf file; Most 
hosts do but some may not!!  Also, she needs to know something about 
HTML and in-particular about iframe tag or better still HTML5 embed 
tag.  Some old browsers may not display embed tag so she needs to 
provide a link to download the file for users who are still using old 
browsers.

Good luck with this.




-- 
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer 
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.

--------------040809070600070908000004
Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=utf-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#F9F7ED" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 03/01/2018 23:05, Cy Burnot wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:mailman.532.1515020790.2365.support-thunderbird@lists.mozilla.org"
      type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?

Thanks.
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    If she knows something about HTML then she might have some success
    in doing this.  However, the best way to distribute a pdf file is by
    attachment as suggested by other posters but there is a better way
    of distributing it and that is by displaying the pdf file on her own
    website and sending a link to her members.  To see how this can be
    done, I suggest look at this website:<br>
    <br>
    <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="https://msu.edu/~urban/sme865/resources/embedded_pdf.html">&lt;https://msu.edu/~urban/sme865/resources/embedded_pdf.html&gt;</a><br>
    <br>
    She needs to have a web-host that allows her to upload a pdf file; 
    Most hosts do but some may not!!  Also, she needs to know something
    about HTML and in-particular about iframe tag or better still HTML5
    embed tag.  Some old browsers may not display embed tag so she needs
    to provide a link to download the file for users who are still using
    old browsers.<br>
    <br>
    Good luck with this.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-signature">-- <br>
      <div class="moz-signature">
        <div style="width: 330px; background-color: blue; color:
          yellow;font-weight: bolder; font-size:150%; text-align:
          center; margin: 30px 5px 30px 5px;">With over 600 million
          devices now running Windows 10, customer satisfaction is
          higher than any previous version of windows.</div>
      </div>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

--------------040809070600070908000004--
0
Good
1/4/2018 4:47:21 PM
Cy Burnot wrote:
> My wife wants to send out a newsletter that (a) is not an attachment
> and (b) is visible in the body of an email.

I fail to see any good reason for that. I'd go even further:
if I'd be subscribed to a pdf newsletter and the sender would
switch from attachment to in-body, I'd immediately unsubscribe
from that newsletter.

-p

0
PietB
1/4/2018 5:18:26 PM
On 01/03/2018 04:05 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
>
> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
>
  Short answer: no.
  It is possible to have TB include attachments "inline". Depending on
the receiving MUA the PDF may actually be displayed inline. It is rather
iffy in general.
  Best to just create it as an email.
  Or use an email service (e.g., Mailchimp, Constant Contact, etc.) that
has loads of tech and templates for creating and emailing newsletters.

-- 
James Moe
jmm-list at sohnen-moe dot com
Think.
0
James
1/4/2018 6:39:58 PM
James Moe wrote:
> On 01/03/2018 04:05 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
>>
>> Is there a way to insert a PDF into the body of an email?
>>
>    Short answer: no.
>    It is possible to have TB include attachments "inline". Depending on
> the receiving MUA the PDF may actually be displayed inline. It is rather
> iffy in general.
>    Best to just create it as an email.
>    Or use an email service (e.g., Mailchimp, Constant Contact, etc.) that
> has loads of tech and templates for creating and emailing newsletters.
> 

I concur.

As noted elsewhere in this thread, PDF is merely a wrapper for content. 
Beyond that, one of the design assumptions of PDF is for producing 
printed output. If you're expecting recipients to print, then it can be 
appropriate.

 From my own experience of producing newsletters I've found:

- Most people don't bother to print out hard copy. The few who do are 
marginal exceptions.

- For mass communication, sending content as attachments is a 
disincentive to reading. For each additional click you make your reader 
do, you'll lose audience, often the people who are busy enough that 
they'll defer reading to some time in the indeterminate future.

- Because of the print focus, reading PDF in a screen can be frustrating 
for some.  Depending on screen layout (e.g., 16:9 or 4:3) and 
resolutions, PDF doesn't always display well -- some recipients may find 
it frustrating that they don't like having to choose between scaling 
fonts to an acceptable size, at the cost of having to scroll content, 
whether vertically or horizontally.  Also, just because your own display 
is aesthetically acceptable to use, don't assume that your recipients 
have the same settings (or necessarily interest in tweaking).

If you want to send content that's essentially web content, you're far 
better off by putting that directly into the message body, and composing 
in HTML. The native tools offered by Thunderbird have quite a bit of 
capacity for HTML content, especially use of tables. And it's quite easy 
to make use of various text formatting tools, as well as inserting 
graphics.  And use of HTML makes it easy for the user to re-scale 
content, according to their own display needs, including screen size and 
resolution and window dimensions.

I also concur suggestion of use of a mailing list provider. Most 
providers have templates to draw from, to lessen the amount of raw 
formatting work that you have to do. Also, a list provider allows for 
better handling of mass-mailing. That includes user-accessible 
subscription management (both opt in and opt out), and often, better 
deliverability of content. If you mail directly, you have to remember to 
use Bcc: (because you don't want to expose the addresses of all your 
recipients to each other), and some mail service providers will throttle 
or reject messages that have too many recipients -- a spam defense. With 
a list service, each recipient receives a separately mailed copy of the 
message, whereas To:/Cc:/Bcc: sends a single copy of the message, and 
then lets the mail service provider deliver separate copies of the 
message to each recipient's inbox.

There's lots of useful things that you can do with PDF, but trying to 
insert PDF into the body of an email message isn't one of them.

Smith

0
NFN
1/5/2018 5:40:19 PM
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