target="_blank" vs. target="_new"

What is the difference between target="_blank" and target="_new"?  I presume 
that there must be some difference, otherwise both would not exist together.
Does target="_blank" make it easier to do exploits against browsers than 
target="_new"?
0
EE
6/12/2019 5:33:33 PM
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EE wrote on 12-06-19 19:33:
> What is the difference between target="_blank" and target="_new"?  I 
> presume that there must be some difference, otherwise both would not 
> exist together.
> Does target="_blank" make it easier to do exploits against browsers 
> than target="_new"?

As far as I know the "_new" target is a real name target.
so if you had opened a "_new" window, if you click on another 
target="_new" the new window goes to the opened "_new" window 
overwritting what it was.


As far as I know the "_blank" target is a reserved name target.
so if you had opened "_blank" window, if you click on another 
target="_blank" the new window goes to ANOTHER "_blank" window leting 
the other opened.
0
Ray_Net
6/12/2019 6:56:43 PM
On 6/12/2019 10:33 AM, EE wrote:
> What is the difference between target="_blank" and target="_new"?  I presume 
> that there must be some difference, otherwise both would not exist together.
> Does target="_blank" make it easier to do exploits against browsers than 
> target="_new"?
> 

The HTML 4.1 specification says:
> 6.16 Frame target names
> 
> Except for the reserved names listed below, frame target names
> (%FrameTarget; in the DTD) must begin with an alphabetic character
> (a-zA-Z). User agents should ignore all other target names.
> 
> The following target names are reserved and have special meanings.
> 
> _blank
>     The user agent should load the designated document in a new, unnamed window.
> _self
>     The user agent should load the document in the same frame as the element that refers to this target.
> _parent
> The user agent should load the document into the immediate FRAMESET
> parent of the current frame. This value is equivalent to _self if the
> current frame has no parent.
> _top
> The user agent should load the document into the full, original
> window (thus canceling all other frames). This value is equivalent to
> _self if the current frame has no parent.
The HTML 5.2 specification says the same thing but with far more detail
(many more words) plus some new features.

In any case, a target name with a leading underscore (_) is only allowed
in HTML 4.1 for the four reserved names.  Any other target name
beginning with a leading underscore is ignored (invalid).  In HTML 5.2,
the underscore is called a "low line character" and is also not allowed
except for the four reserved names.

-- 
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

Donald Trump lied his way onto the Forbes 400 richest people list.
<https://tinyurl.com/yx9ebrqz>
0
David
6/12/2019 9:34:28 PM
Ray_Net wrote:
> EE wrote on 12-06-19 19:33:
>> What is the difference between target="_blank" and target="_new"?  I presume 
>> that there must be some difference, otherwise both would not exist together.
>> Does target="_blank" make it easier to do exploits against browsers than 
>> target="_new"?
> 
> As far as I know the "_new" target is a real name target.
> so if you had opened a "_new" window, if you click on another target="_new" 
> the new window goes to the opened "_new" window overwritting what it was.
> 
> 
> As far as I know the "_blank" target is a reserved name target.
> so if you had opened "_blank" window, if you click on another target="_blank" 
> the new window goes to ANOTHER "_blank" window leting the other opened.

Very clear.  Thanks.

0
EE
6/15/2019 9:46:18 PM
See example at https://www.w3schools.com/tags/att_a_target.asp
0
chokito
6/16/2019 10:55:50 AM
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