saving memory with prefs.js entry

in OS win 7, 64bit......
will "user_pref("config.trim_on_minimize", true);" achieve the desired
effect of reducing memory usage if added to Seamonkey's prefs.js.

how should the preference be added?  should it be in user.js or prefs.js?

Other than protocol, does it really make any difference which file it
would be added to?

Since there is no user.js at this time for seamonkey on my system, which
sub-directory should  the user.js file go in?
0
jrp
3/14/2019 1:04:06 AM
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jrp@comcast.com composed on 2019-03-13 21:04 (UTC-0400):

> how should the preference be added?  should it be in user.js or prefs.js?

> Other than protocol, does it really make any difference which file it
> would be added to?

You should not write to prefs.js. You can read it. For user.js it's the opposite,
the app only reads it, while you create it and write it should you choose to. Content
in user.js will be applied on every startup. Prefs added or changed via about:config
normally remains until intentionally changed.

> Since there is no user.js at this time for seamonkey on my system, which
> sub-directory should  the user.js file go in?

Same directory containing prefs.js.
-- 
Evolution as taught in public schools is religion, not science.

 Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata  ***  http://fm.no-ip.com/
0
Felix
3/14/2019 1:37:07 AM
On 3/13/2019 6:04 PM, jrp@comcast.com wrote:
> in OS win 7, 64bit......
> will "user_pref("config.trim_on_minimize", true);" achieve the desired
> effect of reducing memory usage if added to Seamonkey's prefs.js.
> 
> how should the preference be added?  should it be in user.js or prefs.js?
> 
> Other than protocol, does it really make any difference which file it
> would be added to?
> 
> Since there is no user.js at this time for seamonkey on my system, which
> sub-directory should  the user.js file go in?
> 

I always use user.js to set preference variables to non-default values.
That is because I can annotate each setting with a comment (// on the
beginning of the line) to remind me why I have a non-default value.

Sometimes, I do test changes by requesting about:config.  When I am
through with such testing, however, I revert back to the default setting.

Note that changes to user.js become effective only when all instances of
SeaMonkey are terminated and SeaMonkey is then relaunched.  Also,
changes to preference variables remain in effect even when you delete
the setting from user.js.  To undo a change, you should resort to
about:config, select the preference variable, and then select Reset.

-- 
David E. Ross

Pharmaceutical companies claim their drug prices are
so high because they have to recover the costs of developing
those drugs.  Two questions:

1.  Why is the U.S. paying the entire cost of development while
prices for the same drugs in other nations are much lower?

2.  Manufacturers of generic drugs did not have those
development costs.  Why are they charging so much for generics?
0
David
3/14/2019 3:49:09 AM
David E. Ross wrote:

> I always use user.js to set preference variables to non-default
> values. That is because I can annotate each setting with a comment
> (// on the beginning of the line) to remind me why I have a
> non-default value.

OK, syntax question: Does a comment have to be on a separate line?

In other words, is this possible?

setting here // comment here

Or do you have to do this?

setting here
// comment here

Thanks.

-- 
War doesn't determine who's right, just who's left.
--
Paul B. Gallagher

0
Paul
3/14/2019 6:04:50 AM
On 14/03/19 01:04, jrp@comcast.com wrote:
> in OS win 7, 64bit......
> will "user_pref("config.trim_on_minimize", true);" achieve the desired
> effect of reducing memory usage if added to Seamonkey's prefs.js.
>...

No: because this setting was specific to Windows XP and you have Windows
7 and "on Vista and up it has little to no effect" (from
widget/windows/nsWindow.cpp:845). You should expect it to disappear in
SM versions that take on changes subsequent to FF 52.

/df

-- 
London
UK
0
Dirk
3/14/2019 9:28:35 AM
On Thu, 14 Mar 2019 09:28:35 +0000, Dirk Fieldhouse <"Not Saying"> in
mozilla.support.seamonkey wrote:

>On 14/03/19 01:04, jrp@comcast.com wrote:
>> in OS win 7, 64bit......
>> will "user_pref("config.trim_on_minimize", true);" achieve the desired
>> effect of reducing memory usage if added to Seamonkey's prefs.js.
>>...
>
>No: because this setting was specific to Windows XP and you have Windows
>7 and "on Vista and up it has little to no effect" (from
>widget/windows/nsWindow.cpp:845). You should expect it to disappear in
>SM versions that take on changes subsequent to FF 52.
>
>/df

Thank you, Dirk!  (I knew someone would eventually answer the main
question  :-)   )

I have found that Seamonkey 2.49.3 contains the "about:memory" dialogue
and the minimize memory on that page seems to have reasonably good effect.
0
jrp
3/14/2019 11:00:24 AM
On 3/13/2019 11:04 PM, Paul B. Gallagher wrote:
> David E. Ross wrote:
> 
>> I always use user.js to set preference variables to non-default
>> values. That is because I can annotate each setting with a comment
>> (// on the beginning of the line) to remind me why I have a
>> non-default value.
> 
> OK, syntax question: Does a comment have to be on a separate line?
> 
> In other words, is this possible?
> 
> setting here // comment here
> 
> Or do you have to do this?
> 
> setting here
> // comment here
> 
> Thanks.
> 

I do not know.  I always put the comment on a separate line, immediately
following the command to set the preference variable.  I do this for my
own readability.

-- 
David E. Ross

Pharmaceutical companies claim their drug prices are
so high because they have to recover the costs of developing
those drugs.  Two questions:

1.  Why is the U.S. paying the entire cost of development while
prices for the same drugs in other nations are much lower?

2.  Manufacturers of generic drugs did not have those
development costs.  Why are they charging so much for generics?
0
David
3/14/2019 3:11:36 PM
David E. Ross wrote:
> On 3/13/2019 11:04 PM, Paul B. Gallagher wrote:
>> David E. Ross wrote:
>>
>>> I always use user.js to set preference variables to non-default
>>> values. That is because I can annotate each setting with a comment
>>> (// on the beginning of the line) to remind me why I have a
>>> non-default value.
>>
>> OK, syntax question: Does a comment have to be on a separate line?
>>
>> In other words, is this possible?
>>
>> setting here // comment here
>>
>> Or do you have to do this?
>>
>> setting here
>> // comment here
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
> 
> I do not know.  I always put the comment on a separate line, immediately
> following the command to set the preference variable.  I do this for my
> own readability.
> 
You can add a comment to the end of a line as long as you prefix it with 
2 slashes.

0
EE
3/14/2019 6:35:10 PM
On Thu, 14 Mar 2019 02:04:50 -0400, "Paul B. Gallagher"
<paulbg@pbgdashtranslations.com> in mozilla.support.seamonkey wrote:

>David E. Ross wrote:
>
>> I always use user.js to set preference variables to non-default
>> values. That is because I can annotate each setting with a comment
>> (// on the beginning of the line) to remind me why I have a
>> non-default value.
>
>OK, syntax question: Does a comment have to be on a separate line?
>
>In other words, is this possible?
>
>setting here // comment here
>
>Or do you have to do this?
>
>setting here
>// comment here
>
>Thanks.
>


That is an interesting question.  Consider how the file is laid down to
disk.  Logically, and disregarding fragmented files, it is a straight line
of data with line end characters every 80 or so bytes (depending on what
your line-end has been set as....or a bunch of other factors.)

 


>-- 
>War doesn't determine who's right, just who's left.

0
jrp
3/29/2019 10:56:18 PM
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