Possible Script Button ?

I don't know anything about programming, but can the following be done ?

Can SeaMonkey have a menu button, always available, that when pressed,
interrupts and stops any running script....allowing one to eliminate it ?

My SeaMonkey has a "Stop" button when I get to a web site, but then after
picking a link, the STOP button goes grey.......non-functional.

I can paste links (picture hosting site) showing this if anyone wants......

WHY can't I stop any web page at any time ?

DoctorBill
0
DoctorBill
3/11/2018 4:55:34 PM
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DoctorBill wrote:
> I don't know anything about programming, but can the following be done ?
> 
> Can SeaMonkey have a menu button, always available, that when pressed,
> interrupts and stops any running script....allowing one to eliminate it ?
> 
> My SeaMonkey has a "Stop" button when I get to a web site, but then after
> picking a link, the STOP button goes grey.......non-functional.
> 
> I can paste links (picture hosting site) showing this if anyone wants......
> 
> WHY can't I stop any web page at any time ?
> 
> DoctorBill

I have "NoScript" running (I think!) but as to what choices to toggle in
the program menu - they are ALL JARGON which I do not understand !
I don't even know if it actually IS doing anything....
0
DoctorBill
3/11/2018 5:15:12 PM
DoctorBill wrote:
>>
>> WHY can't I stop any web page at any time ?
>>
>> DoctorBill
> 
> I have "NoScript" running (I think!) but as to what choices to toggle in
> the program menu - they are ALL JARGON which I do not understand !
> I don't even know if it actually IS doing anything...


My experience with NoScript is that it blacklists everything by default, 
and that you generally have to whitelist (temporarily or permanently), 
individual scripting hosts.

At first level of user interface, the default handling is to put a small 
icon in the toolbar at the very bottom of a Seamonkey window. In my 
display, that's between the lock icon that shows certificate 
information, and the icon shown by AdBlock Plus.  In my own 
implementation, I also tweak my Navigation toolbar at the top of the 
display. If I right-click on that toolbar, and select "customize", that 
allows me to drag NoScript buttons into the toolbar.  The buttons for 
Temporarily All Scripts in this Page, and Revoke Temporary Permissions 
should be self-explanatory.  If you use the NoScript button, that's the 
same thing as you get with the icon at the bottom of the page.

If you dig further into the options settings, there's stuff that's a lot 
more cryptic, and I don't understand a lot of them myself, especially in 
the Advanced tab -- a lot of that assumes knowledge of web page design. 
For most of what you want, the settings would be in the General and 
Whitelist tabs.  For most of the stuff in the other tabs, default 
settings should be adequate, unless you know you have specific reason to 
change something.

NoScript has a lot of power, but it takes some tinkering with to get it 
tuned for what you want, especially in handling whitelisting or marking 
specific scripting hosts as permanently untrusted.

For me, I'm generally content to leave nearly everything blacklisted, as 
a default, and then temporarily whitelisting, when needed. But even that 
takes a bit of tinkering.  There's certainly sites that I trust (e.g, 
scripting coming from the domain name itself), and I trust certain 
scripting engines.  Scripting from content mirrors (such as cloudfront), 
or Content Delivery Networks (with CDN) are generally candidates for 
whitelisting. On the other hand, stuff from advertising networks (many, 
but not all may have "ad" in the name, such as adsonar) are worth blocking.

Depending on your browsing habits, some scripting hosts deliver both 
stuff you want to see and stuff you want to block, and sometimes you 
have to choose to accept the garbage, for stuff that you want.  This is 
especially true with some sites that use the same scripting host to 
deliver auto-play media content, photos, and text content.  I've also 
found that with some sites, it takes multiple runs of "Temporarily allow 
all on this page". Some scripting hosts may not try to deliver stuff 
immediately, until you've granted permission to other scripts.  And this 
is especially true with sites that do forms (particularly purchasing). 
Occasionally, I'll get part way into a form, and discover that there's 
scripts that are blocked. When I enable the scripts (and the browser 
repaints the page), then I get a clean form, having lost everything 
that's already been entered.

If you're simply trying to block scripts when they get to be intrusive 
or obnoxious, another approach could be with PrefBar.  One of the 
options there is JavaScript, and if you have that enabled, it's a mtter 
of just toggling a tick box on a toolbar, to turn on or turn off 
scripting.  I don't use that one, but I make occasional use of similar 
options of blocking/enabling images, cookies, sending referrer data, etc.

Smith



0
NFN
3/12/2018 7:41:22 PM
On 3/12/2018 12:41 PM, NFN Smith wrote:
> DoctorBill wrote:
>>>
>>> WHY can't I stop any web page at any time ?
>>>
>>> DoctorBill
>>
>> I have "NoScript" running (I think!) but as to what choices to toggle in
>> the program menu - they are ALL JARGON which I do not understand !
>> I don't even know if it actually IS doing anything...
> 
> 
> My experience with NoScript is that it blacklists everything by default, 
> and that you generally have to whitelist (temporarily or permanently), 
> individual scripting hosts.
> 
> At first level of user interface, the default handling is to put a small 
> icon in the toolbar at the very bottom of a Seamonkey window. In my 
> display, that's between the lock icon that shows certificate 
> information, and the icon shown by AdBlock Plus.  In my own 
> implementation, I also tweak my Navigation toolbar at the top of the 
> display. If I right-click on that toolbar, and select "customize", that 
> allows me to drag NoScript buttons into the toolbar.  The buttons for 
> Temporarily All Scripts in this Page, and Revoke Temporary Permissions 
> should be self-explanatory.  If you use the NoScript button, that's the 
> same thing as you get with the icon at the bottom of the page.
> 
> If you dig further into the options settings, there's stuff that's a lot 
> more cryptic, and I don't understand a lot of them myself, especially in 
> the Advanced tab -- a lot of that assumes knowledge of web page design. 
> For most of what you want, the settings would be in the General and 
> Whitelist tabs.  For most of the stuff in the other tabs, default 
> settings should be adequate, unless you know you have specific reason to 
> change something.
> 
> NoScript has a lot of power, but it takes some tinkering with to get it 
> tuned for what you want, especially in handling whitelisting or marking 
> specific scripting hosts as permanently untrusted.
> 
> For me, I'm generally content to leave nearly everything blacklisted, as 
> a default, and then temporarily whitelisting, when needed. But even that 
> takes a bit of tinkering.  There's certainly sites that I trust (e.g, 
> scripting coming from the domain name itself), and I trust certain 
> scripting engines.  Scripting from content mirrors (such as cloudfront), 
> or Content Delivery Networks (with CDN) are generally candidates for 
> whitelisting. On the other hand, stuff from advertising networks (many, 
> but not all may have "ad" in the name, such as adsonar) are worth blocking.
> 
> Depending on your browsing habits, some scripting hosts deliver both 
> stuff you want to see and stuff you want to block, and sometimes you 
> have to choose to accept the garbage, for stuff that you want.  This is 
> especially true with some sites that use the same scripting host to 
> deliver auto-play media content, photos, and text content.  I've also 
> found that with some sites, it takes multiple runs of "Temporarily allow 
> all on this page". Some scripting hosts may not try to deliver stuff 
> immediately, until you've granted permission to other scripts.  And this 
> is especially true with sites that do forms (particularly purchasing). 
> Occasionally, I'll get part way into a form, and discover that there's 
> scripts that are blocked. When I enable the scripts (and the browser 
> repaints the page), then I get a clean form, having lost everything 
> that's already been entered.
> 
> If you're simply trying to block scripts when they get to be intrusive 
> or obnoxious, another approach could be with PrefBar.  One of the 
> options there is JavaScript, and if you have that enabled, it's a mtter 
> of just toggling a tick box on a toolbar, to turn on or turn off 
> scripting.  I don't use that one, but I make occasional use of similar 
> options of blocking/enabling images, cookies, sending referrer data, etc.
> 
> Smith
> 
> 
> 

There are actually two PrefBar options for stopping JavaScript.  Both
are in the vanilla PrefBar.

*  "Javascript (Tab)" works on the current tab or window.  For this one,
you have to move it from Available Items to Enabled Items.

*  "JavaScript" works on any subsequently launched tab or window but not
on the current one.  This one should already be in Enabled Items.

When I set these up, I called the first one "Local JavaScript" and the
second one "Global JavaScript".

NOTE WELL:  All this becomes defunct when SeaMonkey transitions to
Webextensions.  :(

-- 
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

President Trump:  Please stop using Twitter.  We need
to hear your voice and see you talking.  We need to know
when your message is really your own and not your attorney's.
0
David
3/12/2018 11:00:28 PM
NFN Smith wrote:
> DoctorBill wrote:
>>>
>>> WHY can't I stop any web page at any time ?
>>>
>>> DoctorBill
>>
>> I have "NoScript" running (I think!) but as to what choices to toggle in
>> the program menu - they are ALL JARGON which I do not understand !
>> I don't even know if it actually IS doing anything...
> 
> 
> My experience with NoScript is that it blacklists everything by default, 
> and that you generally have to whitelist (temporarily or permanently), 
> individual scripting hosts.
> 
> At first level of user interface, the default handling is to put a small 
> icon in the toolbar at the very bottom of a Seamonkey window. In my 
> display, that's between the lock icon that shows certificate 
> information, and the icon shown by AdBlock Plus.  In my own 
> implementation, I also tweak my Navigation toolbar at the top of the 
> display. If I right-click on that toolbar, and select "customize", that 
> allows me to drag NoScript buttons into the toolbar.  The buttons for 
> Temporarily All Scripts in this Page, and Revoke Temporary Permissions 
> should be self-explanatory.  If you use the NoScript button, that's the 
> same thing as you get with the icon at the bottom of the page.
> 
> If you dig further into the options settings, there's stuff that's a lot 
> more cryptic, and I don't understand a lot of them myself, especially in 
> the Advanced tab -- a lot of that assumes knowledge of web page design. 
> For most of what you want, the settings would be in the General and 
> Whitelist tabs.  For most of the stuff in the other tabs, default 
> settings should be adequate, unless you know you have specific reason to 
> change something.
> 
> NoScript has a lot of power, but it takes some tinkering with to get it 
> tuned for what you want, especially in handling whitelisting or marking 
> specific scripting hosts as permanently untrusted.
> 
> For me, I'm generally content to leave nearly everything blacklisted, as 
> a default, and then temporarily whitelisting, when needed. But even that 
> takes a bit of tinkering.  There's certainly sites that I trust (e.g, 
> scripting coming from the domain name itself), and I trust certain 
> scripting engines.  Scripting from content mirrors (such as cloudfront), 
> or Content Delivery Networks (with CDN) are generally candidates for 
> whitelisting. On the other hand, stuff from advertising networks (many, 
> but not all may have "ad" in the name, such as adsonar) are worth blocking.
> 
> Depending on your browsing habits, some scripting hosts deliver both 
> stuff you want to see and stuff you want to block, and sometimes you 
> have to choose to accept the garbage, for stuff that you want.  This is 
> especially true with some sites that use the same scripting host to 
> deliver auto-play media content, photos, and text content.  I've also 
> found that with some sites, it takes multiple runs of "Temporarily allow 
> all on this page". Some scripting hosts may not try to deliver stuff 
> immediately, until you've granted permission to other scripts.  And this 
> is especially true with sites that do forms (particularly purchasing). 
> Occasionally, I'll get part way into a form, and discover that there's 
> scripts that are blocked. When I enable the scripts (and the browser 
> repaints the page), then I get a clean form, having lost everything 
> that's already been entered.
> 
> If you're simply trying to block scripts when they get to be intrusive 
> or obnoxious, another approach could be with PrefBar.  One of the 
> options there is JavaScript, and if you have that enabled, it's a mtter 
> of just toggling a tick box on a toolbar, to turn on or turn off 
> scripting.  I don't use that one, but I make occasional use of similar 
> options of blocking/enabling images, cookies, sending referrer data, etc.
> 
> Smith
> 
> 
> 
Wow !  Thank you for those explanations !  You spent quite a bit of effort !

You know 100x more than I do !
My biggest question is - how do you know when a script is running ?
My FoxNews.com web site will work fine and when I get on the "Comments"
part (a lot of fun !) - often it slows nearly to a stop !
I am presuming a script is running and taking over by transmitting some
garbage or trying to invade my computer.....(?)
SO - I don't KNOW what is slowing the works down and I bail out and start
over.
Is there some way to find out - akin to starting something like the Task 
Manager?
How can I know which "script" is running while it is messing with me ?

DoctorBill

0
DoctorBill
3/13/2018 1:22:36 AM
David E. Ross wrote:
> On 3/12/2018 12:41 PM, NFN Smith wrote:
>> DoctorBill wrote:
>>>>
>>>> WHY can't I stop any web page at any time ?
>>>>
>>>> DoctorBill
>>>
>>> I have "NoScript" running (I think!) but as to what choices to toggle in
>>> the program menu - they are ALL JARGON which I do not understand !
>>> I don't even know if it actually IS doing anything...
>>
>>
>> My experience with NoScript is that it blacklists everything by default,
>> and that you generally have to whitelist (temporarily or permanently),
>> individual scripting hosts.
>>
>> At first level of user interface, the default handling is to put a small
>> icon in the toolbar at the very bottom of a Seamonkey window. In my
>> display, that's between the lock icon that shows certificate
>> information, and the icon shown by AdBlock Plus.  In my own
>> implementation, I also tweak my Navigation toolbar at the top of the
>> display. If I right-click on that toolbar, and select "customize", that
>> allows me to drag NoScript buttons into the toolbar.  The buttons for
>> Temporarily All Scripts in this Page, and Revoke Temporary Permissions
>> should be self-explanatory.  If you use the NoScript button, that's the
>> same thing as you get with the icon at the bottom of the page.
>>
>> If you dig further into the options settings, there's stuff that's a lot
>> more cryptic, and I don't understand a lot of them myself, especially in
>> the Advanced tab -- a lot of that assumes knowledge of web page design.
>> For most of what you want, the settings would be in the General and
>> Whitelist tabs.  For most of the stuff in the other tabs, default
>> settings should be adequate, unless you know you have specific reason to
>> change something.
>>
>> NoScript has a lot of power, but it takes some tinkering with to get it
>> tuned for what you want, especially in handling whitelisting or marking
>> specific scripting hosts as permanently untrusted.
>>
>> For me, I'm generally content to leave nearly everything blacklisted, as
>> a default, and then temporarily whitelisting, when needed. But even that
>> takes a bit of tinkering.  There's certainly sites that I trust (e.g,
>> scripting coming from the domain name itself), and I trust certain
>> scripting engines.  Scripting from content mirrors (such as cloudfront),
>> or Content Delivery Networks (with CDN) are generally candidates for
>> whitelisting. On the other hand, stuff from advertising networks (many,
>> but not all may have "ad" in the name, such as adsonar) are worth blocking.
>>
>> Depending on your browsing habits, some scripting hosts deliver both
>> stuff you want to see and stuff you want to block, and sometimes you
>> have to choose to accept the garbage, for stuff that you want.  This is
>> especially true with some sites that use the same scripting host to
>> deliver auto-play media content, photos, and text content.  I've also
>> found that with some sites, it takes multiple runs of "Temporarily allow
>> all on this page". Some scripting hosts may not try to deliver stuff
>> immediately, until you've granted permission to other scripts.  And this
>> is especially true with sites that do forms (particularly purchasing).
>> Occasionally, I'll get part way into a form, and discover that there's
>> scripts that are blocked. When I enable the scripts (and the browser
>> repaints the page), then I get a clean form, having lost everything
>> that's already been entered.
>>
>> If you're simply trying to block scripts when they get to be intrusive
>> or obnoxious, another approach could be with PrefBar.  One of the
>> options there is JavaScript, and if you have that enabled, it's a mtter
>> of just toggling a tick box on a toolbar, to turn on or turn off
>> scripting.  I don't use that one, but I make occasional use of similar
>> options of blocking/enabling images, cookies, sending referrer data, etc.
>>
>> Smith
>>
>>
>>
> 
> There are actually two PrefBar options for stopping JavaScript.  Both
> are in the vanilla PrefBar.
> 
> *  "Javascript (Tab)" works on the current tab or window.  For this one,
> you have to move it from Available Items to Enabled Items.
> 
> *  "JavaScript" works on any subsequently launched tab or window but not
> on the current one.  This one should already be in Enabled Items.
> 
> When I set these up, I called the first one "Local JavaScript" and the
> second one "Global JavaScript".
> 
> NOTE WELL:  All this becomes defunct when SeaMonkey transitions to
> Webextensions.  :(
> 

WHAT does that mean !? "All this becomes defunct when SeaMonkey 
transitions to
Webextensions."  ?  Jargon.....

DoctorBill
0
DoctorBill
3/13/2018 1:24:26 AM
On 3/12/2018 6:24 PM, DoctorBill wrote:
> David E. Ross wrote:
>> On 3/12/2018 12:41 PM, NFN Smith wrote:
>>> DoctorBill wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> WHY can't I stop any web page at any time ?
>>>>>
>>>>> DoctorBill
>>>>
>>>> I have "NoScript" running (I think!) but as to what choices to toggle in
>>>> the program menu - they are ALL JARGON which I do not understand !
>>>> I don't even know if it actually IS doing anything...
>>>
>>>
>>> My experience with NoScript is that it blacklists everything by default,
>>> and that you generally have to whitelist (temporarily or permanently),
>>> individual scripting hosts.
>>>
>>> At first level of user interface, the default handling is to put a small
>>> icon in the toolbar at the very bottom of a Seamonkey window. In my
>>> display, that's between the lock icon that shows certificate
>>> information, and the icon shown by AdBlock Plus.  In my own
>>> implementation, I also tweak my Navigation toolbar at the top of the
>>> display. If I right-click on that toolbar, and select "customize", that
>>> allows me to drag NoScript buttons into the toolbar.  The buttons for
>>> Temporarily All Scripts in this Page, and Revoke Temporary Permissions
>>> should be self-explanatory.  If you use the NoScript button, that's the
>>> same thing as you get with the icon at the bottom of the page.
>>>
>>> If you dig further into the options settings, there's stuff that's a lot
>>> more cryptic, and I don't understand a lot of them myself, especially in
>>> the Advanced tab -- a lot of that assumes knowledge of web page design.
>>> For most of what you want, the settings would be in the General and
>>> Whitelist tabs.  For most of the stuff in the other tabs, default
>>> settings should be adequate, unless you know you have specific reason to
>>> change something.
>>>
>>> NoScript has a lot of power, but it takes some tinkering with to get it
>>> tuned for what you want, especially in handling whitelisting or marking
>>> specific scripting hosts as permanently untrusted.
>>>
>>> For me, I'm generally content to leave nearly everything blacklisted, as
>>> a default, and then temporarily whitelisting, when needed. But even that
>>> takes a bit of tinkering.  There's certainly sites that I trust (e.g,
>>> scripting coming from the domain name itself), and I trust certain
>>> scripting engines.  Scripting from content mirrors (such as cloudfront),
>>> or Content Delivery Networks (with CDN) are generally candidates for
>>> whitelisting. On the other hand, stuff from advertising networks (many,
>>> but not all may have "ad" in the name, such as adsonar) are worth blocking.
>>>
>>> Depending on your browsing habits, some scripting hosts deliver both
>>> stuff you want to see and stuff you want to block, and sometimes you
>>> have to choose to accept the garbage, for stuff that you want.  This is
>>> especially true with some sites that use the same scripting host to
>>> deliver auto-play media content, photos, and text content.  I've also
>>> found that with some sites, it takes multiple runs of "Temporarily allow
>>> all on this page". Some scripting hosts may not try to deliver stuff
>>> immediately, until you've granted permission to other scripts.  And this
>>> is especially true with sites that do forms (particularly purchasing).
>>> Occasionally, I'll get part way into a form, and discover that there's
>>> scripts that are blocked. When I enable the scripts (and the browser
>>> repaints the page), then I get a clean form, having lost everything
>>> that's already been entered.
>>>
>>> If you're simply trying to block scripts when they get to be intrusive
>>> or obnoxious, another approach could be with PrefBar.  One of the
>>> options there is JavaScript, and if you have that enabled, it's a mtter
>>> of just toggling a tick box on a toolbar, to turn on or turn off
>>> scripting.  I don't use that one, but I make occasional use of similar
>>> options of blocking/enabling images, cookies, sending referrer data, etc.
>>>
>>> Smith
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> There are actually two PrefBar options for stopping JavaScript.  Both
>> are in the vanilla PrefBar.
>>
>> *  "Javascript (Tab)" works on the current tab or window.  For this one,
>> you have to move it from Available Items to Enabled Items.
>>
>> *  "JavaScript" works on any subsequently launched tab or window but not
>> on the current one.  This one should already be in Enabled Items.
>>
>> When I set these up, I called the first one "Local JavaScript" and the
>> second one "Global JavaScript".
>>
>> NOTE WELL:  All this becomes defunct when SeaMonkey transitions to
>> Webextensions.  :(
>>
> 
> WHAT does that mean !? "All this becomes defunct when SeaMonkey 
> transitions to
> Webextensions."  ?  Jargon.....
> 
> DoctorBill
> 

PrefBar is an .xpi extension.  These will not work when Webextensions
are implemented in Firefox.  It is expected that SeaMonkey will follow
Firefox's evolution, thus eliminating existing extensions.

The developer of PrefBar has determined that some -- but not all -- of
his extension's capabilities can be implemented in new extensions.  It
appears that each will be done as a separate extension.  However, some
PrefBar capabilities just cannot be made to work as Webextensions.

This is all being done by the Mozilla developers to make Firefox a clone
of Chrome.  If I wanted Chrome, I would install it.  Therefore, when
SeaMonkey becomes affected, I am likely to stop updating SeaMonkey.

-- 
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

President Trump:  Please stop using Twitter.  We need
to hear your voice and see you talking.  We need to know
when your message is really your own and not your attorney's.
0
David
3/13/2018 3:00:45 AM
DoctorBill wrote:

> Wow !  Thank you for those explanations !  You spent quite a bit of 
> effort !

Brevity is... (next to impossible :-)

> 
> You know 100x more than I do !
> My biggest question is - how do you know when a script is running ?

It takes a measure of trial-and-error.

If you click on the NoScript icon in the status bar at the bottom of the 
screen, the pop-up menu shows a number of options, including which 
scripting hosts are active, and which ones are blocked.  From there, you 
can choose to toggle the status of scripts, permanently or temporarily, 
and for individual hosts, or en masse.

In my own use, I leave most blocked, and manually enable individuals, as 
needed, although for sites that I visit frequently, I may permanently 
allow some that I know that are essential to getting to content. 
Conversely, I've permanently designated a handful that are related to 
advertising and usage tracking, including Facebook and Twitter (I don't 
use either one of them) and Google Analytics.

> My FoxNews.com web site will work fine and when I get on the "Comments"
> part (a lot of fun !) - often it slows nearly to a stop !
> I am presuming a script is running and taking over by transmitting some
> garbage or trying to invade my computer.....(?)
> SO - I don't KNOW what is slowing the works down and I bail out and start
> over.
> Is there some way to find out - akin to starting something like the Task 
> Manager?
> How can I know which "script" is running while it is messing with me ?

Looking at the FoxNews site, the initial scripting hosts offered are 
fncstatic.com, and it looks like both are necessary to get thumbnails of 
photos and videos to display. From there, if you go back to the NoScript 
icon, after fncstatic is displayed, then there's a fairly long list of 
other scripting hosts available.  At that point, you can either go the 
route of granting access to all those, or you can play with things, 
enabling or disabling, one at a time.  I notice that if you do 
"temporarily allow all", a subsequent check of NoScript offers several 
more scripting hosts.

To me, that's annoying, but that's the way that web pages are designed 
(especially ones with lots of scripting), where some scripts don't even 
try to run until other scripts have run. Thus, for sites like that, 
sometimes it can take several repeated attempts to grant permissions 
before you find the host that delivers what you want. This is especially 
true with media sites that use scripting (and various scripting hosts) 
for a lot of things, including delivery of basic content (i.e., text), 
animated content, audio and video, ad delivery, usage tracking, user 
authentication (e.g., logins), and more.

Unfortunately, other than with trial and error, it's sometimes difficult 
to tell which scripting hosts are used to get to content that you want, 
and which are tracking and ad networks.

Although I tend to go the route of "least permission", where I grant 
rights one at a time, for this particular site, it might be worth going 
the other way of enabling everything, and then sequentially blocking 
access to one or two sites at a time, then seeing if you can still get 
to what you want.

Smith

0
NFN
3/13/2018 6:04:48 PM
NFN Smith wrote:
> DoctorBill wrote:
>>>
>>> WHY can't I stop any web page at any time ?
>>>
>>> DoctorBill
>>
>> I have "NoScript" running (I think!) but as to what choices to toggle in
>> the program menu - they are ALL JARGON which I do not understand !
>> I don't even know if it actually IS doing anything...
> 
> 
> My experience with NoScript is that it blacklists everything by default, 
> and that you generally have to whitelist (temporarily or permanently), 
> individual scripting hosts.
> 
> At first level of user interface, the default handling is to put a small 
> icon in the toolbar at the very bottom of a Seamonkey window. In my 
> display, that's between the lock icon that shows certificate 
> information, and the icon shown by AdBlock Plus.� In my own 
> implementation, I also tweak my Navigation toolbar at the top of the 
> display. If I right-click on that toolbar, and select "customize", that 
> allows me to drag NoScript buttons into the toolbar.� The buttons for 
> Temporarily All Scripts in this Page, and Revoke Temporary Permissions 
> should be self-explanatory.� If you use the NoScript button, that's the 
> same thing as you get with the icon at the bottom of the page.
> 
> If you dig further into the options settings, there's stuff that's a lot 
> more cryptic, and I don't understand a lot of them myself, especially in 
> the Advanced tab -- a lot of that assumes knowledge of web page design. 
> For most of what you want, the settings would be in the General and 
> Whitelist tabs.� For most of the stuff in the other tabs, default 
> settings should be adequate, unless you know you have specific reason to 
> change something.
> 
> NoScript has a lot of power, but it takes some tinkering with to get it 
> tuned for what you want, especially in handling whitelisting or marking 
> specific scripting hosts as permanently untrusted.
> 
> For me, I'm generally content to leave nearly everything blacklisted, as 
> a default, and then temporarily whitelisting, when needed. But even that 
> takes a bit of tinkering.� There's certainly sites that I trust (e.g, 
> scripting coming from the domain name itself), and I trust certain 
> scripting engines.� Scripting from content mirrors (such as cloudfront), 
> or Content Delivery Networks (with CDN) are generally candidates for 
> whitelisting. On the other hand, stuff from advertising networks (many, 
> but not all may have "ad" in the name, such as adsonar) are worth blocking.
> 
> Depending on your browsing habits, some scripting hosts deliver both 
> stuff you want to see and stuff you want to block, and sometimes you 
> have to choose to accept the garbage, for stuff that you want.� This is 
> especially true with some sites that use the same scripting host to 
> deliver auto-play media content, photos, and text content.� I've also 
> found that with some sites, it takes multiple runs of "Temporarily allow 
> all on this page". Some scripting hosts may not try to deliver stuff 
> immediately, until you've granted permission to other scripts.� And this 
> is especially true with sites that do forms (particularly purchasing). 
> Occasionally, I'll get part way into a form, and discover that there's 
> scripts that are blocked. When I enable the scripts (and the browser 
> repaints the page), then I get a clean form, having lost everything 
> that's already been entered.
> 
> If you're simply trying to block scripts when they get to be intrusive 
> or obnoxious, another approach could be with PrefBar.� One of the 
> options there is JavaScript, and if you have that enabled, it's a mtter 
> of just toggling a tick box on a toolbar, to turn on or turn off 
> scripting.� I don't use that one, but I make occasional use of similar 
> options of blocking/enabling images, cookies, sending referrer data, etc.
> 
> Smith
> 
> 
> 
YesScript works to disable scripts for a particular site.  It makes a 
blacklist for sites not allowed to use scripting.

0
EE
3/13/2018 6:42:43 PM
NFN Smith wrote:
> If you click on the NoScript icon in the status bar at the bottom of the 
> screen,

"If you click on the NoScript icon in the status bar at the bottom of 
the screen,"

There is no Icon like that on the bottom of my screen !
What am I doing wrong ? !
0
DoctorBill
3/13/2018 9:32:25 PM
On 3/13/18, DoctorBill <NoNoNo@gmail.com> wrote:
> NFN Smith wrote:
>> If you click on the NoScript icon in the status bar at the bottom of the
>> screen,
>
> "If you click on the NoScript icon in the status bar at the bottom of
> the screen,"
>
> There is no Icon like that on the bottom of my screen !
> What am I doing wrong ? !

If javascript isn't messing with the context menu you can right click
anywhere on the page and get the noscript menu.  But to get the icon
Tools / Add-ons Manager
NoScript / Options
On the Appearance tab put a checkmark next to
  Status bar icon
  Contextual menu
click OK

Regards,
Lee
0
Lee
3/13/2018 10:02:04 PM
Lee wrote:
> On 3/13/18, DoctorBill <NoNoNo@gmail.com> wrote:
>> NFN Smith wrote:
>>> If you click on the NoScript icon in the status bar at the bottom of the
>>> screen,
>>
>> "If you click on the NoScript icon in the status bar at the bottom of
>> the screen,"
>>
>> There is no Icon like that on the bottom of my screen !
>> What am I doing wrong ? !
> 
> If javascript isn't messing with the context menu you can right click
> anywhere on the page and get the noscript menu.  But to get the icon
> Tools / Add-ons Manager
> NoScript / Options
> On the Appearance tab put a checkmark next to
>    Status bar icon
>    Contextual menu
> click OK

Yep, you need to get to the Appearance tab, and make sure that Status 
Bar and Contextual Menu are enabled.  I think those are defaults, and 
I'm not sure why you might see them as cleared.

If you go back to my first post in this thread, another way of getting 
to NoScript is via buttons the navigation Toolbar. Right-click the 
toolbar, and select Customize.  With NoScript installed, there's three 
options that you can drag-and-drop into the toolbar: NoScript (all the 
same options as the status bar icon), Temporarily Allow All, and Revoke 
Temporary Options.  I normally use the latter two.

One note -- with Firefox moving to WebExtensions, the developer is doing 
both WebEx and XUL versions of the extension.  When FF 57 released, 
NoScript wasn't quite ready, and for a month or so, there were multiple 
updates released each week, including a few times with multiple updates 
in a day. There was also a run of updates for the XUL version (which 
Seamonkey continues to use), and one of the effects was that an update 
reset button preferences, discarding the two buttons I use and replacing 
with the general NoScript button.  Because I track such things, it's a 
useful way of knowing when updates were released, but annoying to have 
to reset my preferences. It's been a while since I've seen that, but 
without checking, I don't know if that's been fixed, or just that 
NoScript has stabilized enough that updates aren't coming nearly as 
frequently.

Smith

0
NFN
3/14/2018 12:43:40 AM
Reply: