Delphi app in Apple App Store for iOS

Have you guys with iPhones and iPads seen that there is a Delphi
produced app, running Interbase To Go, approved for download on the
Apple App Store?

I can't find a link on the web, but search "Embarcadero" on the app
store and it shows up. (My daughter showed me.  ;-)  )

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/21/2013 2:40:00 PM
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> I can't find a link on the web, but search "Embarcadero" on the app
> store and it shows up. (My daughter showed me.  ;-)  )

There are 6 apps that shows up... which one is it?
- Palo Alto
- Embarcadero (Fom Scott James, mapping software or something..)
- Heart of Old San Francisco 1
- MapEasy San Francisco
- US Capital Trivia (Maybe it is this one, from Embarcadero Technologies?)
0
Eric
3/21/2013 2:50:17 PM
> - US Capital Trivia (Maybe it is this one, from Embarcadero Technologies?)

Found it, it is this one
0
Eric
3/21/2013 2:52:04 PM
Eric Fleming Bonilha wrote:

> - US Capital Trivia (Maybe it is this one, from Embarcadero
> Technologies?)

That one.

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/21/2013 2:52:33 PM
> That one.

Well, I played with it, it is quite nice, but it crashes :| if you select to answer 20 questions it will suddenly close when it is about 18 or 19...
0
Eric
3/21/2013 2:55:53 PM
Eric Fleming Bonilha wrote:

> Well, I played with it, it is quite nice, but it crashes :|

Bummer.

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/21/2013 2:58:33 PM
> Bummer.

A 26.3 MB download for a 50 states trivia app is also nothing to brag 
about... It would also be interesting to see if InterBase is really 
competitive on a mobile device vs SQLite (I doubt it is).

Eric
0
Eric
3/21/2013 4:17:00 PM
Just say to me that this app has a lot of pictures
if NOT, then I definitely disappointed of firemonkey -
because this apps weighs about 20 MB - is that the framework itself? More than on windows?!
0
Sergionn
3/21/2013 4:28:49 PM
On 3/21/2013 11:28 AM, Sergionn Rad wrote:
> Just say to me that this app has a lot of pictures
> if NOT, then I definitely disappointed of firemonkey -
> because this apps weighs about 20 MB - is that the framework itself? More than on windows?!

Decompressed it's actually 38MB, and no, it doesn't have a lot of
images.  it has the background image visible in the screenshots, small
images for Correct/Incorrect, and another small image for the results.
What's visible in the AppStore screenshots is pretty much it.  Of
course, since it's FireMonkey, there's all the bitmaps to replicate the
OS provided look and feel too.

I listed out the segments in the executable;  the __text segment is
15MB, __data is 4MB, __rsrc is 5MB, and __linkedit is 13MB.

-- 
Craig Peterson
Scooter Software
0
Craig
3/21/2013 4:46:12 PM
Le 21/03/13 16:46, Craig Peterson a écrit :

> Decompressed it's actually 38MB, and no, it doesn't have a lot of
> images.  it has the background image visible in the screenshots, small
> images for Correct/Incorrect, and another small image for the results.
> What's visible in the AppStore screenshots is pretty much it.  Of
> course, since it's FireMonkey, there's all the bitmaps to replicate the
> OS provided look and feel too.
>
> I listed out the segments in the executable;  the __text segment is
> 15MB, __data is 4MB, __rsrc is 5MB, and __linkedit is 13MB.

Just did a bit of digging - there's around 4MB in half a dozen "style" 
files and 880KB of InterBase database. Since Navigon is a SatNav app, I 
could understand it being around 35MB but my business iPhone app does a 
lot more than ask a few questions and its exe is not much more than 2MB.

You gotta love the way it suddenly crashes after too many questions ;-)

Who did EMBT pay to get this pile of **** approved?

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/21/2013 5:39:42 PM
Am 21.03.2013 18:39, schrieb Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) <Joanna Carter
[Team OOAD]:
> Le 21/03/13 16:46, Craig Peterson a écrit :
> 
>> Decompressed it's actually 38MB, and no, it doesn't have a lot of
>> images.  it has the background image visible in the screenshots, small
>> images for Correct/Incorrect, and another small image for the results.
>> What's visible in the AppStore screenshots is pretty much it.  Of
>> course, since it's FireMonkey, there's all the bitmaps to replicate the
>> OS provided look and feel too.
>>
>> I listed out the segments in the executable;  the __text segment is
>> 15MB, __data is 4MB, __rsrc is 5MB, and __linkedit is 13MB.
> 
> Just did a bit of digging - there's around 4MB in half a dozen "style" 
> files and 880KB of InterBase database. Since Navigon is a SatNav app, I 
> could understand it being around 35MB but my business iPhone app does a 
> lot more than ask a few questions and its exe is not much more than 2MB.
> 
> You gotta love the way it suddenly crashes after too many questions ;-)
> 
> Who did EMBT pay to get this pile of **** approved?
> 

I'd guess: nobody. Apple's approval process now and then fails. Some
german clevermind a few years ago did manage to get an app called "make
me rich" approved which did do nothing and cost 10 euros. Some people
even bought it.

Greetings

Markus
0
Markus
3/21/2013 7:12:24 PM
Le 21/03/13 14:55, Eric Fleming Bonilha a écrit :

> Well, I played with it, it is quite nice, but it crashes :| if you
> select to answer 20 questions it will suddenly close when it is about
> 18 or 19...

Checking out the crash report on my phone states Capital provoked a low 
memory warning.

This is exactly the kind of thing I have been mentioning as a strong 
concern with using libraries that wre primarily intended for desktop use.

Let me reiterate: any iOS app should try to avoid using any more than 
20MB of working memory and too rapid a rate of memory consumption will 
also invoke the "memory guardian", which will promptly shut your app 
down to protect the other, better behaved, apps on your device.

Surely, a 38MB exe should have rung a few alarm bells?

But then, since it was written by someone highly skilled from 
Embarcadero, we can only assume that it is all due to a lack of unit 
tests ;-)

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/22/2013 12:10:48 AM
Le 22/03/13 00:10, Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) <Joanna Carter [Team OOAD] 
a écrit :

> Checking out the crash report on my phone states Capital provoked a low
> memory warning.

Actual memory used is reported as 84,033 pages of 4KB each, followed 
swiftly about 20 seconds later by 92,821 pages.

That's over 371MB of memory for a "simple", single form, question and 
answer app.

Come on EMBT, didn't you even bother to run it through the instruments 
that Apple provide?

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/22/2013 12:23:55 AM
> Come on EMBT, didn't you even bother to run it through the instruments 
> that Apple provide?

You're ignoring how the publicly-released FMX was/is a memory pig on the desktop (on Windows, highly dependent on the hardware; on OS X, just a memory pig). The fact you find it is a memory pig on iOS doesn't rule out the possibility of numerous optimisations between XE3 and the current beta. Optimists might also suggest it doesn't rule out the possibility of further optimisations before FMX/iOS is actually released...
0
Chris
3/22/2013 12:34:05 AM
Le 22/03/13 00:34, Chris Rolliston a écrit :

> You're ignoring how the publicly-released FMX was/is a memory pig on
> the desktop (on Windows, highly dependent on the hardware; on OS X,
> just a memory pig). The fact you find it is a memory pig on iOS
> doesn't rule out the possibility of numerous optimisations between
> XE3 and the current beta. Optimists might also suggest it doesn't
> rule out the possibility of further optimisations before FMX/iOS is
> actually released...

Hi Chris. I'm not ignoring those facts - I'm just amazed that they 
decided to let such a hog out for the public to see :-)

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/22/2013 12:38:40 AM
> {quote:title=Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) wrote:}{quote}
>... and too rapid a rate of memory consumption will 
> also invoke the "memory guardian", which will promptly shut your app 
> down to protect the other, better behaved, apps on your device.

Wow, Steve Jobs' OCPD lives on even after his death. :-( 

 
> Surely, a 38MB exe should have rung a few alarm bells?

I once was an intern at an oil refinery. While getting a tour of a control room in the field, I noticed ominous red lights blinking. I was told that those alarms were attached to tanks that weren't currently in use. I suggested that the alarms should be disabled then. This appeared to be a new thought and I was told that that probably should be done. Less than a year later, the refinery ended up leaking over half a million gallons of oil into a waterway. An alarm had gone off (twice) but operators ignored
 it since it was so sensitive it went off all the time anyway. It was only six hours later after another prolonged alarm and actual shutdown that they took it seriously. The company later admitted the alarm hadn't worked correctly on the underwater pipeline since *1978* (the spill was in 1990!). 

Oh yeah, my point.... I think so many alarm bells are going off at Embarcadero so consistently that these new bells didn't raise any alarm. ;-) Instead, the rule of thumb is: if it can display Marco's face, it ships. :-)
http://blog.marcocantu.com/blog/showing_ios_apps_zeist.html
0
Joseph
3/22/2013 1:59:56 AM
> {quote:title=Nick Hodges wrote:}{quote}
> Have you guys with iPhones and iPads seen that there is a Delphi
> produced app, running Interbase To Go, approved for download on the
> Apple App Store?
>

It's kind of sad the way Nick keeps running to the forum every time he sees a FireMonkey demo or an iOS app like a kid with a new puppy... and then we all proceed to kick the puppy. :-(
0
Joseph
3/22/2013 2:10:13 AM
Chris as practice my short communication with fmx - all these bugs and non-optimized code
will go without any changes into the release, and may even will worsen,
- why is this happening i realy don't know - its mystery for me, maybe just emb managers do not care,
and this product manufactured only for show and report to shareholders
- a shame that I bought into it, spent nearly 2 years on fmx and waiting for their final ios release and got now piece of **** :(
0
Sergionn
3/22/2013 6:32:13 AM
Le 22/03/13 01:59, Joseph Mitzen a écrit :

> Wow, Steve Jobs' OCPD lives on even after his death. :-(

Maybe the "guardian" was Steve Jobs' idea, maybe not.

Either way, I am grateful that something is in there trying to keep my 
device from completely dying and needing a reboot.

BTW, the guardian does issue low memory warnings that can be captured 
programatically and dealt with by removing objects that are using 
excessive memory.

It is only when the developer of the app has failed to respond to those 
warnings that the guardian finally terminates the app.

Personally, I think the fact that a program, running on a device that 
only provides 1GB of memory for all processes including the OS, can grab 
over 300MB before being killed, indicates that the guardian is not 
overly "obsessive" :-)

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/22/2013 8:10:54 AM
> Chris as practice my short communication with fmx - all these bugs and non-optimized code
> will go without any changes into the release, and may even will worsen,

I don't think that's fair - XE2 RTM was awful, and XE2 update 4 even worse, but it seems pretty clear to me that the XE3 branch must have been forked very early after XE2 RTM, given it is fundamentally better. That said, the refactoring effort for XE3 wasn't finished on its own terms, and I'm not sure about a couple of the optimisation attempts either...

> - why is this happening i realy don't know - its mystery for me, maybe
> just emb managers do not care, and this product manufactured only for
> show and report to shareholders

Went in a panic after son-of-CLX took longer than expected, and was then dropped? I sincerely believed EMBT were doing a good job up until XE2 - each release overall was more solid than the last, notwithstanding the rushed release of things like generics, which unfortunately proved to be harbingers of what was to come...
0
Chris
3/22/2013 1:21:52 PM
> It's kind of sad the way Nick keeps running to the forum every time he sees a FireMonkey demo or an iOS app like a kid with a new puppy... and then we all proceed to kick the puppy. :-(

To be fair, I don´t think that Embarcadero posted that app as way to advertise Delphi for iOS or something... for me it is more like a test to check if App Store would accept Delphi made iOS apps, they haven´t announced or blogged anything about this app, this software was "found" in app store, so, don´t be so picky about this app. And as for a test, I don´t think they could just create a blank form to see if it was going to be accepted on App Store, they must need some "real" app to test...
0
Eric
3/22/2013 2:26:00 PM
Eric Fleming Bonilha wrote:

> To be fair, I don´t think that Embarcadero posted that app as way to
> advertise Delphi for iOS or something... for me it is more like a
> test to check if App Store would accept Delphi made iOS apps, they
> haven´t announced or blogged anything about this app, this software
> was "found" in app store, so, don´t be so picky about this app. And
> as for a test, I don´t think they could just create a blank form to
> see if it was going to be accepted on App Store, they must need some
> "real" app to test...

It's kind of cool that Interbase can be embedded in an iOS app.  Hasn't
SQLLite been the only "Acceptable" DBMS up to that point?

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/22/2013 2:40:18 PM
Of course, why it should to be announced - it's almost 27 mb of pure shame
0
Sergionn
3/22/2013 2:43:46 PM
> The fact you find it is a memory pig on iOS doesn't rule out the 
> possibility of numerous optimisations between XE3 and the current beta.

hope does, indeed, die last.
0
marc
3/22/2013 3:06:18 PM
> Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]

Wow! Joanna can post into forums again!
0
Dmitry
3/22/2013 3:49:49 PM
Le 22/03/13 14:40, Nick Hodges a écrit :

> It's kind of cool that Interbase can be embedded in an iOS app.  Hasn't
> SQLLite been the only "Acceptable" DBMS up to that point?

Really?

Is it "cool" that the database for that simple app includes:

CAPITALS.GDB           - 880KB
admin.ib               - 423KB
ibconfig               -  11KB
interbase.msg          - 140KB
iblitexe3ios.slip      -   1KB
licence.txt            -  40KB
oss_licence_notice.txt -  13KB
                         ======
Total                   1517KB

All that for a table that, as far as I can see from the GDB file, 
without using a DB tool, is no bigger than 50 rows by 2 or 3 columns.

And that doesn't mention the linked in Interbase library, which forms 
part of the massive 38.6MB exe.

As opposed to a SQLite database with approximately the same structure 
and amount of data, which comes out at less than 150KB and the database 
engine is part of the OS.

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/22/2013 5:15:46 PM
It seems that the guys from emb and their minions
don't understand such complex calculations, from some time ago
they think and talk in terms of: *cool* or *wow*..........
and of corse legendary: *buy a new version of the super duper rad studio xexxxxx*
0
Sergionn
3/22/2013 5:34:07 PM
> > The fact you find it is a memory pig on iOS doesn't rule out the 
> > possibility of numerous optimisations between XE3 and the current beta.
> 
> hope does, indeed, die last.

Er, well maybe I offered 'hope', but I wasn't expressing it...
0
Chris
3/22/2013 6:21:18 PM
IMO it is cool.
> CAPITALS.GDB           - 880KB
> admin.ib               - 423KB
> ibconfig               -  11KB
> interbase.msg          - 140KB
> iblitexe3ios.slip      -   1KB
> licence.txt            -  40KB
> oss_licence_notice.txt -  13KB
>                           ======
> Total                   1517KB

What is your point on this files? They just show the deployment of a 
database that lacked mainenance. Since this obviously is a testapp - who 
should care?
0
Roland
3/25/2013 2:07:32 PM
> {quote:title=Nick Hodges wrote:}{quote}
> Have you guys with iPhones and iPads seen that there is a Delphi
> produced app, running Interbase To Go, approved for download on the
> Apple App Store?
> 
> I can't find a link on the web, but search "Embarcadero" on the app
> store and it shows up. (My daughter showed me.  ;-)  )
> 
> -- 
> Nick

US Capital Trivia - First Embarcadero Mobile Studio for iOS app with FireMonkey XE 3.5/4 & Interbase ToGo for iOS 
http://www.uquery.com/apps/p1w19/us-capital-trivia
https://itunes.apple.com/app/us-capital-trivia/id591499415
https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/embarcadero-technologies-inc/id526095190

Embarcadero apps in Apple Store (using uQuery)
http://www.uquery.com/publishers/MNIhe/embarcadero-technologies-inc

uQuery - Apple Store Search Engine
http://www.uquery.com/
0
Ciprian
3/25/2013 2:12:35 PM
Le 25/03/13 14:07, Roland Kossow a écrit :

> IMO it is cool.
>> CAPITALS.GDB           - 880KB
>> admin.ib               - 423KB
>> ibconfig               -  11KB
>> interbase.msg          - 140KB
>> iblitexe3ios.slip      -   1KB
>> licence.txt            -  40KB
>> oss_licence_notice.txt -  13KB
>>                            ======
>> Total                   1517KB
>
> What is your point on this files? They just show the deployment of a
> database that lacked mainenance. Since this obviously is a testapp - who
> should care?

My point is that it is all extra payload that isn't required with SQLite.

And keeping distribution size and memory footprint are essential parts 
of well-behaved mobile apps.

It's also not just a “test app", it's also a demo app, which bombs 
because the author didn't have a clue what they were doing as regards 
memory usage

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/25/2013 3:39:23 PM
Indeed, I'll not call this trivia application a very *"lite"* one ... since into a whooping of *26 MB* of the compressed .ipa file (Apple Store zipped install package) and *47 MB* uncompressed content, it end up including *40 MB* of ARM binaries, oddly separated per-page (thus NOT images, other resources...etc). Excluding the Interbase ToGo database (*1.4 MB*) and the images (*4.6 MB*) the remaining space is consumed *JUST* by the Delphi for iOS / ARM binaries ....  
So it look like there is a lot of *bonus fat* coming with the FireMonkey or iOS RTL API ... :(  Maybe the app was still caring some debug symbols or excessive RTTI data ...?!
In this context, even the new Oracle ADF Mobile Java applications for iOS, including a full-blown JRE 6 level JVM for ARM into the iOS package starts to look *"slim"* ...

For some comparisons just look to RemObjects *Browse500* iOS app compiled using their new (in beta) Oxygene/Nougat compiler ending up in under *1M* (full .ipa) with the binary part as small as *680 KB* ... 
http://blogs.remobjects.com/blogs/mh/2013/01/17/p5466
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/browse500/id590224221?mt=8
https://github.com/dwarfland/Browse500

There is a clear difference here, since there is no FireMonkey in Nougat and no Interbase ToGo ... but in terms of generated binary the difference is quite huge ... 
It remains to see how much productive the iOS FireMonkey based apps are to supplement this bonus fat ...
Maybe the compiler guys (no smart linker ?!) should pay more attention to this area ... to trim the fat out .... 
Anyhow, even on Windows we see alot of fat coming with the new Delphi Xx compilers due to generics, RTTI, etc.... and some time ago I created this QC#103317 without any progress :(

QC#103317 - Extended $RTTI for metadata inclusions & exclusions for classes and units
http://qc.embarcadero.com/wc/qcmain.aspx?d=103317

> {quote:title=Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) wrote:}{quote}
> Le 22/03/13 14:40, Nick Hodges a écrit :
> 
> > It's kind of cool that Interbase can be embedded in an iOS app.  Hasn't
> > SQLLite been the only "Acceptable" DBMS up to that point?
> 
> Really?
> 
> Is it "cool" that the database for that simple app includes:
> 
> CAPITALS.GDB           - 880KB
> admin.ib               - 423KB
> ibconfig               -  11KB
> interbase.msg          - 140KB
> iblitexe3ios.slip      -   1KB
> licence.txt            -  40KB
> oss_licence_notice.txt -  13KB
>                          ======
> Total                   1517KB
> 
> All that for a table that, as far as I can see from the GDB file, 
> without using a DB tool, is no bigger than 50 rows by 2 or 3 columns.
> 
> And that doesn't mention the linked in Interbase library, which forms 
> part of the massive 38.6MB exe.
> 
> As opposed to a SQLite database with approximately the same structure 
> and amount of data, which comes out at less than 150KB and the database 
> engine is part of the OS.
> 
> Joanna
> 
> -- 
> Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Ciprian
3/25/2013 3:46:43 PM
> My point is that it is all extra payload that isn't required with SQLite.

But the GDB files could probably be much smaller if they were maintained.
Besides of that I agree with your small footprint requirement ...
0
Roland
3/25/2013 6:42:37 PM
Le 25/03/13 18:42, Roland Kossow a écrit :

> But the GDB files could probably be much smaller if they were maintained.

It's not just the bloated GDB file either, it's all the extra binaries 
and config files that need to be added to support InterBase; SQLite is 
already embedded in the main OS, so no extra baggage like Interbase 
requires.

My question would be why on earth you would need such a "heavyweight" 
database engine for mobile apps?

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/25/2013 10:44:08 PM
> It's also not just a “test app", it's also a demo app, which bombs
> because the author didn't have a clue what they were doing as regards
> memory usage

IIn this case I completely agree with you. Having these sizes for small
application is outrageous.
0
Konstantine
3/25/2013 10:47:26 PM
Ciprian,

> For some comparisons just look to RemObjects *Browse500* iOS app 
> compiled using their new (in beta) Oxygene/Nougat compiler ending up in 
> under *1M* (full .ipa) with the binary part as small as *680 KB* ...

actually, i'm afraid that Browse500 binary is so big because it 
contains debug symbols ;). i should have turned those off for the 
release config, but for some reason didn't...

—marc
0
marc
3/26/2013 12:54:53 PM
> {quote:title=Eric Fleming Bonilha wrote:}{quote}
> > It's kind of sad the way Nick keeps running to the forum every time he sees a FireMonkey demo or an iOS app like a kid with a new puppy... and then we all proceed to kick the puppy. :-(
> 
> To be fair, I don´t think that Embarcadero posted that app as way to advertise Delphi for iOS or something... for me it is more like a test to check if App Store would accept Delphi made iOS apps, they haven´t announced or blogged anything about this app, this software was "found" in app store, so, don´t be so picky about this app. And as for a test, I don´t think they could just create a blank form to see if it was going to be accepted on App Store, they must need some "real" app to test...

Then watch this space for other Embarcadero apps in Apple Store
http://www.uquery.com/publishers/MNIhe/embarcadero-technologies-inc
0
Ciprian
3/26/2013 3:22:04 PM
Am 25.03.2013 23:44, schrieb Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) <Joanna Carter
[Team OOAD]:
> Le 25/03/13 18:42, Roland Kossow a écrit :
> 
>> But the GDB files could probably be much smaller if they were maintained.
> 
> It's not just the bloated GDB file either, it's all the extra binaries 
> and config files that need to be added to support InterBase; SQLite is 
> already embedded in the main OS, so no extra baggage like Interbase 
> requires.
> 
> My question would be why on earth you would need such a "heavyweight" 
> database engine for mobile apps?
> 

I'm not sure but two items come into my mind:

1. it might have capabilities SQLite doesn't have

2. some people might have already Interbase based products and
   knowledge which would transfer quicker and simpler to a different
   flavour of Interbase.

Greetings

Markus
0
Markus
3/26/2013 7:33:13 PM
Le 26/03/13 19:33, Markus Humm a écrit :

If I may reply, not to argue but to suggest :-)

> I'm not sure but two items come into my mind:
>
> 1. it might have capabilities SQLite doesn't have

Don't forget we are talking about creating *mobile* apps, not fully 
fledged desktop apps.

I'm not sure what kind of apps you would write for a mobile device, 
which has limited memory and power but, if you need such sophistication, 
then maybe the design of the app needs reviewing :-)

> 2. some people might have already Interbase based products and
>     knowledge which would transfer quicker and simpler to a different
>     flavour of Interbase.

The Cocoa frameworks provide Core Data, which is an OPF framework that 
works with specialised data access classes to ensure that only the 
number of objects (records) required to populate a table view are ever 
in memory at any one time.

Even if you were to use SQLite, you would still have to take care that 
any query didn't return so many records that it triggered the memory 
guardian.

As can be demonstrated from EMBT's foray into iOS "database" apps, you 
really have to think very differently about what you can and cannot do 
on a small mobile device.

Remember, most well-behaved apps try to keep their average memory use to 
less than 20MB. I do wonder how much memory simply loading the GDB file 
in Capitals took?

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/26/2013 8:21:42 PM
Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) wrote:

> maybe the design of the app needs reviewing :-)

Or maybe it's awesome to have the full power of Interbase at your
disposal.


> Remember, most well-behaved apps try to keep their average memory use
> to less than 20MB. I do wonder how much memory simply loading the GDB
> file in Capitals took?

Who needs more than 640K?

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/26/2013 8:31:20 PM
Le 26/03/13 20:31, Nick Hodges a écrit :

> Or maybe it's awesome to have the full power of Interbase at your
> disposal.

For what? It's a phone! :-)

Seriously though, can you think of an application that could demonstrate 
a genuine need for a "heavyweight" database engine on a small mobile device?

> Who needs more than 640K?

Obviously the author of Capitals ;-)

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/26/2013 9:17:59 PM
> {quote:title=Nick Hodges wrote:}{quote}
> Have you guys with iPhones and iPads seen that there is a Delphi
> produced app, running Interbase To Go, approved for download on the
> Apple App Store?
> 
> I can't find a link on the web, but search "Embarcadero" on the app
> store and it shows up. (My daughter showed me.  ;-)  )
> 
> -- 
> Nick


On my ipod touch it bombed after 5 questions. I never did get to find out the capitol of Nebraska.
0
David
3/26/2013 10:57:10 PM
Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) wrote:

> Seriously though, can you think of an application that could
> demonstrate a genuine need for a "heavyweight" database engine on a
> small mobile device?

Any desktop application that currently uses such a database.



-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/26/2013 11:10:46 PM
David Heffernan wrote:

> I never did get to find out the capitol of Nebraska.

Lincoln.

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/26/2013 11:11:23 PM
Le 26/03/13 23:10, Nick Hodges a écrit :

> Any desktop application that currently uses such a database.

Please take this in the spirit it was told to me when I first started 
writing iOS apps...

Your POV tells me that you really don't yet "get" phone and tablet 
computing :-)

Maybe MS think they can mix the two paradigms with their lap/tab sort of 
device but, when you are dealing with iOS, the same "rules" really don't 
apply.

An iPad is not a small desktop, it is a class of device that has its own 
particular way of working.

Although you can attach a Bluetooth keyboard, most users tend to use the 
software touch keyboard.

As I have said many times, memory is limited, not just in size but in 
the rate that it is allocated; too much too quickly and your app gets 
terminated.

And then there's the situation when another process does something bad 
or there are just too many processes taking too much memory and yours 
gets terminated, even though it did nothing wrong.

When you press the "home" button, your app is not normally terminated, 
it is simply moved to the background, still occupying memory.

You simply can't afford to use "heavyweight" libraries and large data 
files and, for proof, you only have to try and run Capitals :-)

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/26/2013 11:34:17 PM
On 3/26/2013 4:11 PM, Nick Hodges wrote:
> David Heffernan wrote:
>
>> I never did get to find out the capitol of Nebraska.
>
> Lincoln.
>

No, that's the answer to "What role did Daniel Day Lewis get his most 
recent Oscar for?"

David Erbas-White
0
David
3/27/2013 12:09:07 AM
David Erbas-White wrote:

> No, that's the answer to "What role did Daniel Day Lewis get his most 
> recent Oscar for?"

No, thats the answer to "Who was a vampire hunter?"

-- 
Cheers,
David Clegg
dclegg@gmail.com
http://cc.embarcadero.com/author/72299
QualityCentral. The best way to bug Embarcadero about bugs.
http://qc.embarcadero.com

"Old people don't need companionship. They need to be isolated and
studied so it can be determined what nutrients they have that might be
extracted for our personal use." - Homer Simpson
0
David
3/27/2013 12:19:19 AM
Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) wrote:

> Your POV tells me that you really don't yet "get" phone and tablet 
> computing :-)

Yes, I'm quite sure I don't, since you said I don't.

TL;DR

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/27/2013 12:19:59 AM
Nick Hodges wrote:

> Yes, I'm quite sure I don't, since you said I don't.

Ooooh!  Touched a nerve there, Joanna. 

-- 
SteveT
0
Steve
3/27/2013 12:36:36 AM
Steve Thackery wrote:

> Ooooh!  Touched a nerve there, Joanna. 

Indeed --  One of Joanna's favorite pasttimes is telling us all how
little we know.

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/27/2013 1:28:38 AM
David Heffernan wrote:


> On my ipod touch it bombed after 5 questions. I never did get to find
> out the capitol of Nebraska.

It's on K street:

  http://capitol.org/

-- 
Dave Nottage [TeamB]
0
Dave
3/27/2013 4:12:26 AM
Le 27/03/13 01:28, Nick Hodges a écrit :

> Indeed --  One of Joanna's favorite pasttimes is telling us all how
> little we know.

Hey, when I first started doing iOS work, someone told me exactly the 
same thing and, do you know, they were right.

I had been doing desktop work for around 20 years and most things that I 
thought of as "good ideas™" for my first iOS app were actually fairly 
rubbish and I needed correcting.

When I approach a new programming challenge, I, for one, welcome 
criticism from those who have been doing it longer than I, because it 
helps me to learn where I am wrong and makes me a better programmer.

And, do you know? After over two years of iOS development I can only say 
I'm starting to "get it". Fortunately, I have peers with whom I can 
share my ideas, who will constructively criticise and help me to improve.

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/27/2013 7:40:41 AM
Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) wrote:

> As I have said many times, memory is limited, not just in size but in 
> the rate that it is allocated; too much too quickly and your app gets 
> terminated.

When I was still trying to use FireMonkey for iOS development, I fell
into that trap.  I started by building the skeleton of the navigation
framework for the app, which was a series of TMS TableViews.  Nothing
there but instantiating the tableviews.  Compiled and ran on the
simulator just fine.  Deployed it to the device, and it crashed upon
startup.  There was no evil code in it.  It simply allocated too much
memory too fast, and the operating system deemed it to be evil, and
killed it.  The total amount of memory wasn't really all that great in
the big scheme of things, maybe 2 MB, but it was all allocated at once,
and I guess iOS extrapolates that "gobble rate" and thinks you're going
to take gigs or something, and bbbbbffffffffffttttttttt you is gone.

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/27/2013 2:28:23 PM
David Clegg wrote:

> No, thats the answer to "Who was a vampire hunter?"

No, no, no, that's the answer to "Who made the logs?"

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/27/2013 2:29:21 PM
Am 26.03.2013 21:21, schrieb Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) <Joanna Carter
[Team OOAD]:
> Le 26/03/13 19:33, Markus Humm a écrit :
> 
> If I may reply, not to argue but to suggest :-)
> 
>> I'm not sure but two items come into my mind:
>>
>> 1. it might have capabilities SQLite doesn't have
> 
> Don't forget we are talking about creating *mobile* apps, not fully 
> fledged desktop apps.
> 
> I'm not sure what kind of apps you would write for a mobile device, 
> which has limited memory and power but, if you need such sophistication, 
> then maybe the design of the app needs reviewing :-)
> 

Hello,

many mobile devices nowdays have 1 GB RAM and when I look back a few
years what PCs had and what type of databases/sophisticated applications
ran on them I can only see battery capacity as limiting element now as
CPUs increasingly become dual core and up nowdays even on said mobile
devices.

Greetings

Markus
0
Markus
3/27/2013 8:50:44 PM
Am 27.03.2013 15:28, schrieb Van Swofford:
> Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) wrote:
> 
>> As I have said many times, memory is limited, not just in size but in 
>> the rate that it is allocated; too much too quickly and your app gets 
>> terminated.
> 
> When I was still trying to use FireMonkey for iOS development, I fell
> into that trap.  I started by building the skeleton of the navigation
> framework for the app, which was a series of TMS TableViews.  Nothing
> there but instantiating the tableviews.  Compiled and ran on the
> simulator just fine.  Deployed it to the device, and it crashed upon
> startup.  There was no evil code in it.  It simply allocated too much
> memory too fast, and the operating system deemed it to be evil, and
> killed it.  The total amount of memory wasn't really all that great in
> the big scheme of things, maybe 2 MB, but it was all allocated at once,
> and I guess iOS extrapolates that "gobble rate" and thinks you're going
> to take gigs or something, and bbbbbffffffffffttttttttt you is gone.
> 

Hello,

so it seems iOS lacks some API to tell it: "hey I'm going to allocate
quite a bunch of RAM now, up to n MB (where n is a parameter to the
call) so don't kill me unless I exeed the gobble rate with more than say
5-10% of what I specified.". That would enable you, if you knew the
final required amount, to inform the OS beforehand and it could be ok
for it. Of course there would have to be some resonable upper limit to n.

Greetings

Markus
0
Markus
3/27/2013 8:55:48 PM
Markus Humm wrote:

> many mobile devices nowdays have 1 GB RAM and when I look back a few
> years what PCs had and what type of databases/sophisticated
> applications ran on them I can only see battery capacity as limiting
> element now as CPUs increasingly become dual core and up nowdays even
> on said mobile devices.

Gee, I wonder if mobile devices will ever have more memory, CPU power,
and storage that they have right now, thus enabling more powerful
applications than they do right now.

Hmmm.  ;-)

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/27/2013 8:58:42 PM
Nick Hodges wrote:

> Gee, I wonder if mobile devices will ever have more memory, CPU power,
> and storage that they have right now, thus enabling more powerful
> applications than they do right now.
> 
> Hmmm.  ;-)

I sure hope so.  In the meantime, I have to work with what's available.
If I'm lucky, I'll still be in business when the day comes when mobile
devices are as capable as desktops.  :-)

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/27/2013 9:14:26 PM
> Gee, I wonder if mobile devices will ever have more memory, CPU power,
> and storage that they have right now, thus enabling more powerful
> applications than they do right now.
>
> Hmmm.  ;-)


In case of Embarcadero all that power seems to be immediately
wasted on sloppy programming. After all what are few megabytes
between friends.

I am very much against senseless optimizations but compiler
and RTL must be a shining example of efficiency. What we
have lately is uncontrolled bloat and sloppiness instead.
0
Konstantine
3/27/2013 9:52:22 PM
Le 27/03/13 20:55, Markus Humm a écrit :

> so it seems iOS lacks some API to tell it: "hey I'm going to allocate
> quite a bunch of RAM now, up to n MB (where n is a parameter to the
> call) so don't kill me unless I exeed the gobble rate with more than say
> 5-10% of what I specified.". That would enable you, if you knew the
> final required amount, to inform the OS beforehand and it could be ok
> for it. Of course there would have to be some resonable upper limit to n.

I think the big difference, when compared to "desktop" devices, is that, 
when apps move to the background, they are expected to be available, in 
the same state as when they were moved, when a user returns to the app; 
and that background state could last days, weeks or longer.

Many users don't realise that, when they open apps on an iOS device, it 
*never* leaves memory until either the device crashes, an app crashes or 
the user learns how to force quit the open apps.

I have seen users phones with several tens of apps on them. It only 
takes one "greedy" app to not only crash itself but, also, to take other 
apps with it.

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/27/2013 10:55:43 PM
Markus Humm wrote:

> so it seems iOS lacks some API to tell it: "hey I'm going to allocate
> quite a bunch of RAM now, up to n MB (where n is a parameter to the
> call) so don't kill me unless I exeed the gobble rate with more than
> say 5-10% of what I specified.". That would enable you, if you knew
> the final required amount, to inform the OS beforehand and it could
> be ok for it. Of course there would have to be some resonable upper
> limit to n.

I don't think that would be right.  Before long such an API call would
become boiler-plate code built into every application, such that they
programmer needn't worry about memory usage.  Thus the whole thing
would be rendered worthless.

No, I'm all in favour of an OS prioritising its own stability, and that
of all the other apps, higher than an app that doesn't observe the
well-known rules.

-- 
SteveT
0
Steve
3/28/2013 12:02:58 AM
> Gee, I wonder if mobile devices will ever have more memory, CPU power,
> and storage that they have right now, thus enabling more powerful
> applications than they do right now.

Of course they will, but then, like always happened, what will be 
expected of them will evolve as well.

If your last-gen software need next-gen hardware, then you have a 
problem, as it will not look very good when pitted against next-gen 
software that was designed for that next-gen hardware.

Eric
0
Eric
3/28/2013 8:35:13 AM
Eric,

>> Gee, I wonder if mobile devices will ever have more memory, CPU power,
>> and storage that they have right now, thus enabling more powerful
>> applications than they do right now.
> 
> Of course they will, but then, like always happened, what will be
> expected of them will evolve as well.

indeed. computers will never ever be "fast enough".

—marc
0
marc
3/28/2013 9:19:54 AM
> indeed. computers will never ever be "fast enough".

Actually I think this is exactly what did happen to desktops.
They got so powerful that there is very little reason to upgrade.
I remember myself always looking for latest and greatest once a year.

Well not anymore. Ok I put SSD drive as a system drive and
put some USB 3 adapters but other then that the whole thing
keeps flying on every task (except Delphi<g>). Every time
I start itching for upgrade I just can't find a single
practical reason.

So to treat myself and satisfy some practical needs
I did buy Asus G75 gaming laptop (SSD, USB3 ports,
core i7, 16GB of RAM yadda yadda yadda) which goes with me when I need 
to do some real development outside of my office.
0
Konstantine
3/28/2013 10:38:41 AM
Konstantine,

> Actually I think this is exactly what did happen to desktops.
> They got so powerful that there is very little reason to upgrade.
> I remember myself always looking for latest and greatest once a year.
> 
> Well not anymore. Ok I put SSD drive as a system drive and
> put some USB 3 adapters but other then that the whole thing
> keeps flying on every task (except Delphi<g>). Every time
> I start itching for upgrade I just can't find a single
> practical reason.

true. upgrade cycles have definitely come down, but i think thats 
mainly a factor of the first double decade of our industry taking off 
have seen such a tremendously fast evolution. I'm currently on a 2008 
Mac Pro, and i'm just now slowly starting to look forward to getting a 
new one — and that's a five year old machine, and my main complain is 
graphics performance (i think the newer OSs are a bit more taxing on 
graphics for the old card to keep up driving a 30").

things have slowed down, but they will never stop. a new computer you 
buy today will *not* be something you wanna use 10 years down the road. 
and the one you buy in 10 years, will be "too slow" in 20. Stuff keeps 
getting fancier, and we keep expecting more. Albeit at a slower pace 
than we used to.

—marc
0
marc
3/28/2013 11:09:19 AM
> Actually I think this is exactly what did happen to desktops.
> They got so powerful that there is very little reason to upgrade.

I don't agree, the problem is not that desktops got powerful enough, 
it's that performance plateau'ed, no longer was a 3 years old machine 
outclassed by a factor two (or more if you factor GPUs).

 > I remember myself always looking for latest and greatest once a year.

Upgrading every year or two brought very obvious speedups, but when the 
plateau was reached, you wouldn't get more than 10 or 20% from an upgrade.

> Every time I start itching for upgrade I just can't find a single
> practical reason.

I would love to have a 2 or 3 times faster system, but I can't find one, 
not in any realistic envelope in terms of noise and weight anyway (and 
don't get me started on those CPUs that are silent when idle, but get 
all the fans kicking in high gear whenever you start stressing them)

Eric
0
Eric
3/28/2013 11:26:01 AM
> I would love to have a 2 or 3 times faster system, but I can't find one,
> not in any realistic envelope in terms of noise and weight anyway (and
> don't get me started on those CPUs that are silent when idle, but get
> all the fans kicking in high gear whenever you start stressing them)


Well you're obviously have bigger needs in terms of performance the
I do. Yes if they did release computer that is 2-3 times more powerful
for the same money, I'll probably buy it. But that'd be more like
buying a new toy. From the pure business perspective for what I do
and I do a lot I can't really justify better comp.
0
Konstantine
3/28/2013 12:20:55 PM
Konstantine Poukhov wrote:

> Well you're obviously have bigger needs in terms of performance the
> I do. Yes if they did release computer that is 2-3 times more powerful
> for the same money, I'll probably buy it. But that'd be more like
> buying a new toy. From the pure business perspective for what I do
> and I do a lot I can't really justify better comp.

I'm in the same boat.  I have a 2010 Mac Pro that is perfectly
adequate, though not screaming fast.  The new ones don't provide a big
enough performance boost to be worth the upgrade cost.  I'll probably
switch the main disk to an SSD at some point, and perhaps add a USB 3
card for an external backup disk that I have, and that's all I'm
planning to do for the next 2 or 3 years.  Maybe some new developments
between now and then would change my mind, but barring that, I'm set.

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/28/2013 2:40:17 PM
> Well you're obviously have bigger needs in terms of performance the
> I do.

Or maybe lower noise tolerance ;)

I just can't stand all those fans going into high gear as soon as I load 
a core to 100% for a few minutes.

Eric
0
Eric
3/28/2013 4:36:06 PM
Am 28.03.2013 01:02, schrieb Steve Thackery:
> Markus Humm wrote:
> 
>> so it seems iOS lacks some API to tell it: "hey I'm going to allocate
>> quite a bunch of RAM now, up to n MB (where n is a parameter to the
>> call) so don't kill me unless I exeed the gobble rate with more than
>> say 5-10% of what I specified.". That would enable you, if you knew
>> the final required amount, to inform the OS beforehand and it could
>> be ok for it. Of course there would have to be some resonable upper
>> limit to n.
> 
> I don't think that would be right.  Before long such an API call would
> become boiler-plate code built into every application, such that they
> programmer needn't worry about memory usage.  Thus the whole thing
> would be rendered worthless.
> 
> No, I'm all in favour of an OS prioritising its own stability, and that
> of all the other apps, higher than an app that doesn't observe the
> well-known rules.
> 

So that means if some app really should need that amount of memory it
must artificially slow down loading of that data?

Greetings

Markus
0
Markus
3/28/2013 6:35:58 PM
Am 28.03.2013 12:26, schrieb Eric Grange:
>> Actually I think this is exactly what did happen to desktops.
>> They got so powerful that there is very little reason to upgrade.
> 
> I don't agree, the problem is not that desktops got powerful enough, 
> it's that performance plateau'ed, no longer was a 3 years old machine 
> outclassed by a factor two (or more if you factor GPUs).
> 
>  > I remember myself always looking for latest and greatest once a year.
> 
> Upgrading every year or two brought very obvious speedups, but when the 
> plateau was reached, you wouldn't get more than 10 or 20% from an upgrade.
> 
>> Every time I start itching for upgrade I just can't find a single
>> practical reason.
> 
> I would love to have a 2 or 3 times faster system, but I can't find one, 
> not in any realistic envelope in terms of noise and weight anyway (and 
> don't get me started on those CPUs that are silent when idle, but get 
> all the fans kicking in high gear whenever you start stressing them)
> 

Part of that is using cheap and noisy fans from far east. I know
somebody making fans which should be way more silent (albeit more
expensive, but you often get what you pay for).

Greetings

Markus
0
Markus
3/28/2013 6:39:23 PM
> I just can't stand all those fans going into high gear as soon as I load
> a core to 100% for a few minutes.

Liquid cooler is your friend. But here's something. I do load all cores
100% but I do not hear fans all that much. Maybe because my case stays
open and it is always cool in my basement and the fan does not
have to work all that hard
0
Konstantine
3/28/2013 7:15:13 PM
Markus Humm wrote:

> So that means if some app really should need that amount of memory it
> must artificially slow down loading of that data?

Yes.  Every OS requires apps to behave by certain rules of "courtesy",
I would suggest.  Like in Windows you don't set your priorities to real
time just to make it seem snappier.  And so on.

Knowing the limitations imposed by the OS you can design accordingly.

-- 
SteveT
0
Steve
3/28/2013 9:07:22 PM
Konstantine Poukhov wrote:

> Actually I think this is exactly what did happen to desktops.
> They got so powerful that there is very little reason to upgrade.

I agree with Konstantine here.  I would suggest it is extremely rare
for a modern desktop machine to become processor-bound (or even I/O
bound) to the point of the user noticing.  This is especially true with
an SSD as your main drive.

Of course there are always *some* applications that can eat all the
gold they are fed, but these are only used by a small number of pros.
Video processing, for example.  Also, maybe some business applications
that munch gigabytes of data, but that's normally done server-side, I
would think.

I realise Marc didn't restrict his comments.  I just wanted to say that
I think desktop machines have been fast enough for 99% of users for
quite some time.  I also accept that servers may well never be fast
enough.

-- 
SteveT
0
Steve
3/28/2013 9:11:47 PM
Steve,

| I would suggest it is extremely rare
| for a modern desktop machine to become processor-bound (or even I/O
| bound) to the point of the user noticing.

I encounter and curse the issue EVERY day!!!  (Quad-core i5 cpu.) 


-- 

   Q 

03/28/2013 14:28:41

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/28/2013 9:30:08 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> I encounter and curse the issue EVERY day!!!  (Quad-core i5 cpu.) 

What on earth do you do with it?  (And have you changed to an SSD?)

-- 
SteveT
0
Steve
3/28/2013 9:47:53 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:
 
> I encounter and curse the issue EVERY day!!!  (Quad-core i5 cpu.) 

Yeah, mine's a quad-core i5 bumped to 4.4GHz.  It goes like
shit-off-a-shovel for most stuff (obviously not when starting up
Delphi, but what would?)

FTR, D2010 takes a stunning 10s to load after a reboot (5s on
subsequent loads).  That's a serious lot of instructions.  I think
Embarcadero are really clever to make it do that.

-- 
SteveT
0
Steve
3/28/2013 9:52:15 PM
Steve,

| What on earth do you do with it?  (And have you changed to an SSD?)

<g>  

Combinatorial statistical probability analysis.  

And I can only do number combinations of up to 20 numbers at a time.  I
would like to be able to do combinations of up to 38 numbers.

For example:  There are 184,756 10 number Sets combinations of 20
numbers.  I generate them and then process them against tens of
thousands of spins.  The spins and Combo numbers are in arrays in
memory.  It only takes a few seconds to generate the 184,756 Sets but
the analysis process, against 15,404 spins for example, takes 3 minutes
and a few seconds.  And 11+ minutes for 1,100,500 Sets against those
same spins.

No, the hard drive is really not the issue.   


-- 

   Q 

03/28/2013 16:20:08

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/28/2013 11:39:23 PM
Go to hell (and you will)! 

;-)
0
Kramer
3/28/2013 11:46:33 PM
Kramer,

| Go to hell (and you will)! 
| 
| ;-)

I'm not worried since there is NO "hell."  <g>  

My poor little system can't handle the 35,345,263,800 (that's billions)
of combinations I would like to be able to process.  It would take 177
GB just to store the Sets array.

I know, I know,... I need a super-computer. <g>  


-- 

   Q 

03/28/2013 17:10:25

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 12:17:49 AM
I work with a Linux cluster with over 700 CPUs and a few hundreds of GB of RAM. 

What's my cut?

;-)
0
Kramer
3/29/2013 12:44:20 AM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> Combinatorial statistical probability analysis.  
> 
> And I can only do number combinations of up to 20 numbers at a time.
> I would like to be able to do combinations of up to 38 numbers.

Something tells me I might be the butt of some subtle joke here.  But,
I'll bite anyway: what does this mean and why do you do it?

-- 
SteveT
0
Steve
3/29/2013 12:57:03 AM
> Something tells me I might be the butt of some subtle joke here.  But,
> I'll bite anyway: what does this mean and why do you do it?

Lemme guess... Gambling?
0
Konstantine
3/29/2013 1:18:04 AM
On 3/28/2013 5:57 PM, Steve Thackery wrote:
> Quentin Correll wrote:
>
>> Combinatorial statistical probability analysis.
>>
>> And I can only do number combinations of up to 20 numbers at a time.
>> I would like to be able to do combinations of up to 38 numbers.
>
> Something tells me I might be the butt of some subtle joke here.  But,
> I'll bite anyway: what does this mean and why do you do it?
>


He does analysis of roulette wheel operations -- 36 numbers plus 0 and 00.

(not joking)

David Erbas-White
0
David
3/29/2013 1:40:40 AM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> Kramer,
> 
> >  Go to hell (and you will)! 
> >  
> >  ;-)
> 
> I'm not worried since there is NO "hell."  <g>  
> 
> My poor little system can't handle the 35,345,263,800 (that's
> billions) of combinations I would like to be able to process.  It
> would take 177 GB just to store the Sets array.
> 
> I know, I know,... I need a super-computer. <g>  

No problem.  Nick'll whip you up an iOS app to handle that.  :-)

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/29/2013 2:39:01 AM
David Erbas-White wrote:

> He does analysis of roulette wheel operations -- 36 numbers plus 0
> and 00.

Somebody needs to write Quentin a theme song, "King o' the Wheel" or
something like that.  :-)

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/29/2013 2:41:00 AM
Van Swofford wrote:

> David Erbas-White wrote:
> 
> > He does analysis of roulette wheel operations -- 36 numbers plus 0
> > and 00.
> 
> Somebody needs to write Quentin a theme song, "King o' the Wheel" or
> something like that.  :-)

Watch out - he might sing it for you!  :-)

-- 
Tred
0
John
3/29/2013 4:48:52 AM
> Liquid cooler is your friend. But here's something. I do load all cores
> 100% but I do not hear fans all that much.

During winter I have no trouble either, but come spring or a very sunny 
day, and all hells breaks loose...

Eric
0
Eric
3/29/2013 7:07:42 AM
> Part of that is using cheap and noisy fans from far east. I know
> somebody making fans which should be way more silent (albeit more
> expensive, but you often get what you pay for).

It's already a silent fan... problem is, I'm getting used to fanless.
And the transition is usually most painful in spring and when the sunny 
days come back... ie. right now here :)

Eric
0
Eric
3/29/2013 7:09:46 AM
> Of course there are always *some* applications that can eat all the
> gold they are fed, but these are only used by a small number of pros.

Not really: kick a game and your CPU will go in high gear, along with 
the GPU, so you get a double set of noisy fans...

I've got a fanless GPU as well, but fanless GPUs only go so far...

Eric
0
Eric
3/29/2013 7:12:09 AM
Eric,

>> Well you're obviously have bigger needs in terms of performance the
>> I do.
> 
> Or maybe lower noise tolerance ;)
> 
> I just can't stand all those fans going into high gear as soon as I load
> a core to 100% for a few minutes.

You can hear your Mac Pro? i can't.

the only fan that *sometimes* spins up to be audible is the graphics 
card, and only when it's clearly being abused.

—marc
0
marc
3/29/2013 10:00:10 AM
Kramer,

| I work with a Linux cluster with over 700 CPUs and a few hundreds of
| GB of RAM.
| 
| What's my cut?
| 
| ;-)

<chuckle>  Sorry, the app is proprietary.  ;-)  


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 10:36:56

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 5:37:59 PM
Van,

| No problem.  Nick'll whip you up an iOS app to handle that.  :-)

Yeah,...  right,...  

Nick has seen the app hands-on.  He just shook his head and said:
"Here, Q, let me buy you a beer."  ;-)  And then we wandered away, Nick
mumbling something about guys growing apps over twenty years without a
major re-design.  <g>


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 10:37:41

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 5:42:28 PM
Fishfacts XE4?
0
Kramer
3/29/2013 6:15:35 PM
Steve,

| Something tells me I might be the butt of some subtle joke here.  But,
| I'll bite anyway: what does this mean and why do you do it?

I have a friend-client, rather well-off, who is a bit of a
"High-Roller" and likes to play roulette.  In 1989 he showed me some
data that set-off a now twenty-four year old (set of) project(s), now
coalesced into two apps called "RouletteCyclesIII" and "Q-DAP" (Q's
Dynamic Adaptive Probability).

I do it because it makes money.  

If you are interested in a bit more historical info I can send you the
"Introduction" to my Q-DAP booklet.


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 10:42:19

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 6:20:23 PM
Konstantine,

| Lemme guess... Gambling?

Yes, specifically roulette.  


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 11:20:05

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 6:20:51 PM
John,

| |  Somebody needs to write Quentin a theme song, "King o' the Wheel"
| | or  something like that.  :-)
| 
| Watch out - he might sing it for you!  :-)

Never.   


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 11:20:45

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 6:21:35 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> Nick has seen the app hands-on.  He just shook his head and said:
> "Here, Q, let me buy you a beer."  ;-)  And then we wandered away,
> Nick mumbling something about guys growing apps over twenty years
> without a major re-design.  <g>

I'll just say this:  Your app is unique, and was very helpful to the
R&D team.  ;-)

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/29/2013 6:40:24 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> Van,
> 
> >  No problem.  Nick'll whip you up an iOS app to handle that.  :-)
> 
> Yeah,...  right,...  
> 
> Nick has seen the app hands-on.  He just shook his head and said:
> "Here, Q, let me buy you a beer."  ;-)  And then we wandered away,
> Nick mumbling something about guys growing apps over twenty years
> without a major re-design.  <g>

Hmm, sounds a lot like my main app.  Maybe I should show it to some
people.  Seems like a good way to get 'em to buy me beer.  :-)

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/29/2013 6:51:56 PM
Kramer,

| Fishfacts XE4?

Don't have a clue what you're asking about. <g> 


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 12:08:08

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 7:08:55 PM
Nick,

| I'll just say this:  Your app is unique, and was very helpful to the
| R&D team.  ;-)

Why thanks!  <g>  


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 12:09:02

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 7:09:53 PM
Van,

| Hmm, sounds a lot like my main app.  Maybe I should show it to some
| people.  Seems like a good way to get 'em to buy me beer.  :-)

 <g> 


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 12:10:11

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 7:10:51 PM
Nick,

| I'll just say this:  Your app is unique, and was very helpful to the
| R&D team.  ;-)

It DOES work!  ;-)  


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 12:10:58

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 7:11:38 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> It DOES work!  ;-)  

Oh, I know it does.  ;-)

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/29/2013 7:58:17 PM
> If you are interested in a bit more historical info I can send you the
> "Introduction" to my Q-DAP booklet.

Completely forgot. I was supposed to send you a booklet about that
nice bridge that I have for sale ;)
0
Konstantine
3/29/2013 8:13:48 PM
Konstantine,

| Completely forgot. I was supposed to send you a booklet about that
| nice bridge that I have for sale ;)

I don't do bridges.  :-P  


-- 

   Q 

03/29/2013 15:08:42

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/29/2013 10:09:29 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> Konstantine,
> 
> >  Completely forgot. I was supposed to send you a booklet about that
> >  nice bridge that I have for sale ;)
> 
> I don't do bridges.  :-P  

How about Canasta?  :-)

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/30/2013 4:26:46 PM
Van,

| |  I don't do bridges.  :-P  
| 
| How about Canasta?  :-)

Nope, only poker.  


-- 

   Q 

03/30/2013 10:41:33

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/30/2013 5:42:16 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> Nope, only poker.  

I'm a pinochle man, myself.

Actually, I've never played pinochle, I hate passing up an opportunity
to say it.

Pinochle.

Pinochle.

Okay, I'm done now.

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/30/2013 5:48:23 PM
Joanna,

On Tue, 26 Mar 2013 20:21:42 -0000, Joanna Carter <"Joanna Carter [Team  
OOAD]" <"" ">"""> wrote:

> As can be demonstrated from EMBT's foray into iOS "database" apps, you
> really have to think very differently about what you can and cannot do
> on a small mobile device.

"Thinking differently" is probably much more difficult for EMBT when for  
years they have been responding to every complaint about the increasing  
size of .EXEs with "Size no longer matters"

-- 
Paul Scott
Information Management Systems
Macclesfield, UK
0
Paul
3/30/2013 6:01:41 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> Van,
> 
> >  |  I don't do bridges.  :-P  
> >  
> >  How about Canasta?  :-)
> 
> Nope, only poker.  

No pay, no play?  :-)

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/30/2013 8:30:51 PM
Nick Hodges wrote:

> Quentin Correll wrote:
> 
> > Nope, only poker.  
> 
> I'm a pinochle man, myself.
> 
> Actually, I've never played pinochle, I hate passing up an opportunity
> to say it.
> 
> Pinochle.
> 
> Pinochle.
> 
> Okay, I'm done now.

Some words just cry out for being said over and over.  Mine is
rutabaga.  I'll spare you the repetition.  :-)

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
3/30/2013 8:32:51 PM
Van Swofford wrote:

> Some words just cry out for being said over and over.  Mine is
> rutabaga.  I'll spare you the repetition.  :-)

Undertaker. Undertaker. 

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/30/2013 9:01:56 PM
Nick,

| I'm a pinochle man, myself.
| 
| Actually, I've never played pinochle, I hate passing up an opportunity
| to say it.
| 
| Pinochle.
| 
| Pinochle.
| 
| Okay, I'm done now.

LOL! 

Well,... Willy and I are off early tomorrow morning to Las Vegas, until
next Thursday, so I can play in a poker tournament.


-- 

   Q 

03/30/2013 18:38:04

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/31/2013 1:39:26 AM
Van,

| |  Nope, only poker.  
| 
| No pay, no play?  :-)

Poker isn't poker unless it's for real money.  


-- 

   Q 

03/30/2013 18:40:07

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
3/31/2013 1:40:37 AM
Van Swofford wrote:

> Nick Hodges wrote:
> 
> > Quentin Correll wrote:
> > 
> > > Nope, only poker.  
> > 
> > I'm a pinochle man, myself.
> > 
> > Actually, I've never played pinochle, I hate passing up an opportunity
> > to say it.
> > 
> > Pinochle.
> > 
> > Pinochle.
> > 
> > Okay, I'm done now.
> 
> Some words just cry out for being said over and over.  Mine is
> rutabaga.  I'll spare you the repetition.  :-)

Parmesans for me.  "I don't understand ze Parmesans!"

-- 
don't Tred on me
0
John
3/31/2013 2:55:47 AM
John Treder wrote:

> Parmesans for me.  "I don't understand ze Parmesans!"

Ointment.  OintmentOintmentOintment.

Ointment.

-- 
Nick
0
Nick
3/31/2013 3:21:57 AM
"Van Swofford" <jvsREMOVE@tybeejetNOSPAM.com> wrote in message 
news:563106@forums.embarcadero.com...
> rutabaga.

Les Nessman did a *wonderful* documentary on the poor rutabaga :)


-- 
Wayne Niddery (TeamB)
Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to seem smarter when they come 
at you rapidly.
0
Wayne
3/31/2013 3:35:53 AM
> {quote:title=Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) wrote:}{quote}

> That's over 371MB of memory for a "simple", single form, question and 
> answer app.


When I complained about the bloat in Delphi executables recently, some people answered they couldn´t imagine why it would matter.. I think Embarcadero just proved my point. In order to develop a "hello world", one shouldn´t have to link in all the world.
0
Arthur
3/31/2013 12:46:35 PM
> {quote:title=Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) wrote:}{quote}

> As opposed to a SQLite database with approximately the same structure 
> and amount of data, which comes out at less than 150KB and the database 
> engine is part of the OS.


It wouldn´t mind so much if the Interbase database and any libraries can be shared among multiple apps. Can it?
0
Arthur
3/31/2013 12:50:18 PM
Le 31/03/13 13:50, Arthur Hoornweg a écrit :

> It wouldn´t mind so much if the Interbase database and any libraries
> can be shared among multiple apps. Can it?

Nope. Such databases and third-party libraries have to operate within 
the app's sandbox, invisible to other apps.

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/31/2013 2:33:16 PM
Le 31/03/13 13:46, Arthur Hoornweg a écrit :

> When I complained about the bloat in Delphi executables recently,
> some people answered they couldn´t imagine why it would matter.. I
> think Embarcadero just proved my point. In order to develop a "hello
> world", one shouldn´t have to link in all the world.

I guess, on the desktop, such bloat is less of a problem but, on a 
mobile platform, it's totally out of the question.

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
3/31/2013 2:36:33 PM
Wayne Niddery wrote:

> "Van Swofford" <jvsREMOVE@tybeejetNOSPAM.com> wrote in message 
> news:563106@forums.embarcadero.com...
> > rutabaga.
> 
> Les Nessman did a wonderful documentary on the poor rutabaga :)

Did he win a Silver Sow award for that?  :-)

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
4/1/2013 1:52:02 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> Van,
> 
> >  |  Nope, only poker.  
> >  
> >  No pay, no play?  :-)
> 
> Poker isn't poker unless it's for real money.  

But then, bridge and canasta aren't poker...

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
4/1/2013 1:52:39 PM
"Quentin Correll" <qcorrell@pacNObell.net> wrote in message 
news:562716@forums.embarcadero.com...
>
> I know, I know,... I need a super-computer. <g>

That depends on how fast you want to get to the answer... :)

A rack of 16-or-so of these, with additional memory in each (maybe add'l 
12GB, prob. cost more than unit itself), should cover
your set creation.  8-cores per unit (2x4-core CPUs).
http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=SM-XQC266X2-PB-R&cat=SVR

Unfortunately, they prob. don't have enough in stock at once to sell you 16, 
but, I don't know.

We don't have that specific unit, I don't think, but we bought five somewhat 
like items to do some crunching on something
(about 1month runtime for initial part of it), and they've done OK for us so 
far...

The one's we have (2.5GHz, 8GB mem X7DCA-L units) seem happy to remote boot 
(although I didn't want that, and took me a while to figure out how to
disable it), and have been running fairly cool in an open office cubicle.

A sound-proofed room would be better though, as they _are_ pretty noisy.

To avoid add'l expense tho, you'd prob. need to use Linux (clusters), and 
thus freepascal - but for your number-crunching code, I'd guess FP might not 
be too hard an adaptation.
0
david
4/1/2013 1:53:03 PM
"Quentin Correll" <qcorrell@pacNObell.net> wrote in message 
news:562716@forums.embarcadero.com...
>
> I know, I know,... I need a super-computer. <g>

Or, maybe that'd be a good use for some of those 'cloud' services, people 
were discussing a while back...
0
david
4/1/2013 1:55:13 PM
david,

| A rack of 16-or-so of these, with additional memory in each (maybe
| add'l 12GB, prob. cost more than unit itself), should cover your set
| creation.

I don't think I'm going to even think about that. <g>  
  


-- 

   Q 

04/01/2013 08:48:30

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
4/1/2013 3:51:27 PM
david,

| Or, maybe that'd be a good use for some of those 'cloud' services,
| people were discussing a while back...

Can you imagine trying to address 256GB or more of memory in a cloud
environment?  I can't. <g>


-- 

   Q 

04/01/2013 08:50:36

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
4/1/2013 3:51:30 PM
Van,

| |  Poker isn't poker unless it's for real money.  
| 
| But then, bridge and canasta aren't poker...

!!! 


-- 

   Q 

04/01/2013 08:52:01

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
4/1/2013 3:52:08 PM
Van,

Southwest blew our trip to Las Vegas for my poker tournament.   Our
plan had "maintenance" problems on it's way to San Jose and got stuck
in Ontario, CA for over six hours.  So we had to cancel.


-- 

   Q 

04/01/2013 08:52:27

1.19.1.372  [Q'sBrokenToolBar] [Running on TQ]
0
Quentin
4/1/2013 3:55:18 PM
Quentin Correll wrote:

> Van,
> 
> Southwest blew our trip to Las Vegas for my poker tournament.   Our
> plan had "maintenance" problems on it's way to San Jose and got stuck
> in Ontario, CA for over six hours.  So we had to cancel.

Aw man, that's a bummer.  It happens though.  If you have time to
spare, go by air.  :-)

-- 
Cheers,
Van

"Half of what I say is meaningless..." - John Lennon
"Your job is to figure out which half." - Van Swofford
0
Van
4/1/2013 4:06:31 PM
Am 28.03.2013 22:07, schrieb Steve Thackery:
> Markus Humm wrote:
> 
>> So that means if some app really should need that amount of memory it
>> must artificially slow down loading of that data?
> 
> Yes.  Every OS requires apps to behave by certain rules of "courtesy",
> I would suggest.  Like in Windows you don't set your priorities to real
> time just to make it seem snappier.  And so on.
> 
> Knowing the limitations imposed by the OS you can design accordingly.
> 

Hello,

the difference in those examples is: for most applications on Windows it
won't make much if any difference if priority is set to real time. But
when loading data into memory artificially slowing this down surely
leads to a doubled load time, won't it? Just to cater for a fear of the
OS? But the memory amount consumed at the end is the same, only the user
get's annoyed meanwhile because the app loads slower than necessary.
Great idea! ;-)

Greetings

Markus
0
Markus
4/1/2013 4:55:56 PM
Le 01/04/13 17:55, Markus Humm a écrit :

> But the memory amount consumed at the end is the same, only the user
> get's annoyed meanwhile because the app loads slower than necessary.
> Great idea! ;-)

It's not about slowing the app down, it's usually a case of a developer 
doing daft things like trying to load an entire database into memory 
instead of paging the records in.

Or, if you use FMX, simply trying to load a couple or so empty listboxes :-)

Joanna

-- 
Joanna Carter [Team OOAD]
0
Joanna
4/1/2013 5:04:25 PM
Am 01.04.2013 19:04, schrieb Joanna Carter (Team OOAD) <Joanna Carter
[Team OOAD]:
> Le 01/04/13 17:55, Markus Humm a écrit :
> 
>> But the memory amount consumed at the end is the same, only the user
>> get's annoyed meanwhile because the app loads slower than necessary.
>> Great idea! ;-)
> 
> It's not about slowing the app down, it's usually a case of a developer 
> doing daft things like trying to load an entire database into memory 
> instead of paging the records in.
> 

This depends on the size of the database and whether paging in is a
viable approach or not. What I was referirng to is: if the amount or RAM
used at the end is equal it doesn't matter how much that size has been
reached (as long as it's no leak and doesn't continue to climb).
So if the app really needs it (not like the seemingly bloated FMX
example app you're referring to) and the app is the currently active one
running in the foreground it would be wise to load data as fast as
possible. So a notification to the OS would be ok. It could even be a
fuinction returning wheter it will be ok to request that amount of RAM
thus anticipating further developments in the future which surely will
lead to more powerful devices...

Greetings

Markus
0
Markus
4/2/2013 4:14:59 PM
Reply:

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I am trialing XE7 to find out if it supports our needs. In my potential app, the user will be grading various things for self-monitoring. I want to export/import to/from DropBox, so the user can take data with them across Android and iPhone as the user changes. It is not important (although nice) the data is in sync across all devices. What matter more than anything is: Will I with Delphi XE7 Pro be able to download/upload e.g. XML file using DropBox API? Two potential soluttions I can imagine: 1) The user has DropBox installed on the phone which is something I can require witho...

Can I do this with iOS apps developed in Delphi XE4 Pro + iOS?
I still don't have XE4/iOS as I have some questions first. Do I have access to iOS "native" library/system? What do I use for internet (downloading files etc.) - Indy? *If my research is correct, Google maps is available for iOS? Can I use Google maps or Apple's maps solutions in Delphi iOS apps?* If I have XE4 Pro, can I still use database functionality? Any restrictions? (Am I allowed to use what iOS offers or connect with a database on a webserver?) Anyone here developed demo apps I can see available in Apple iTunes store? (Even simple apps is okay as I onl...

Dragging and dropping a .WAV from Delphi App to other apps
Is there an easy way to drag a .WAV file from a Delphi 2006 App to another app. It's not from a listbox or anything like that. It's from a custom window. My code would need to be responsible for generating a .WAV file based on where the person initially clicked on a window. Is the only way to drop a file from a Delphi 2006 to use complicated COM routines? If so, then would the other app that receives the file need complicated com routines too, or would it work with any app that could accept a the same dropped file type from Explorer? Thanks. "Jeff Ya...

How do You Write a Web App that Looks like Your Delphi App
Hi I have written an application that I would like to port into a web application. What is the best language to choose. For example php, Ruby on Rails or some other language.. Thank you. > {quote:title=Peter Skinner wrote:}{quote} > Hi > > I have written an application that I would like to port into a web application. What is the best language to choose. > > For example php, Ruby on Rails or some other language.. > > Thank you. Here's something you can try with very little investment of time, which is to auto-convert your existing app's m...

Delphi 7 app to web app conversion [Edit]
My company has an old Windows engineering application that we would like to convert to a web application so that we can offer it as a software as a service. The application is written primarily in Delphi 7 with the heavy number crunching done in Fortran (I did say it was old!). We would like to reuse as much of the existing Delphi code as possible and only modify the Fortran enough so that it will run in the background on the web server. We have never developed a web application so we're looking for guidance on the best way to make this conversion. Our questions at this point: ...

How to convert an MDI app to a paned app like the Delphi IDE
I have an old app that uses the MDI style. And I would like to modernise it to use multiple docked/paned windows (e.g something like MS Outlook or the Delphi IDE say). Does anyone have any tips about what needs to be done to migrate my current MDI Forms to the new UI concept. (The app is several hundred thousand lines of code, so a rewrite is out of the question...) AndrewFG Andrew Fiddian-Green wrote: > I have an old app that uses the MDI style. And I would like to > modernise it to use multiple docked/paned windows (e.g something like > MS Outlook or the Delphi ...

Delphi app?
Have a look. http://profantasy.com/products/ft_creating.asp What do you think? Delphi app? -- Dennis Landi Allied Data, Inc. http://www.allied-data.com Electron Server http://www.electronserver.com Dennis Landi wrote: > What do you think? Delphi app? Cool! I got a C code from a Danish guy 15 years ago for the calculations - and created an app that created GIF images of fractal planetary maps in Linux. I mostly used it to create random maps to my desktop background(!). Finally someone has wrote a product of the subject (with some extensions:)... The opt...

My first iOS app with Delphi XE4
Hello I just made a video from my first iOS app that I made with Delphi XE4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_lEPpp7oeA This is a software that "turns" your iPhone into a security camera, streaming live video from the iPhone camera to Digifort camera surveillance system (Also compiled in XE4). I took about 2 weeks to finish the app (Including the time to learn the Firemonkey for iOS), but now I'm just waiting apple developer to be online again in order to send my app for approval Comments are appreciated! Eric Fleming Bonilha wrote: > Comments are appreciated...

problem delphi 2010 apps with a delphi 5 pro Pchar
Hallo I build on till now alle tools and programas with delphi 5 pro now i have delphi 2010 want don't want rewite alle my DLL Tools Like The tool i made for making PDF In case of This DLL i can't becose the vcl i use in delphi 5 will not work in delphi 2010 *This call in apps* {code} Function GenratePDF(Settings:Pchar):Boolean; stdcall external 'GUPPDF2.dll'; {code} *In delphi 5 DLL* {code} Function GenratePDF(Settings:Pchar):Boolean; stdcall; {code} if call the function i get a "Access violation" i think that the settings parameter empty is...

Web resources about - Delphi app in Apple App Store for iOS - embarcadero.delphi.non-tech

Delphi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
... an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in the valley of Phocis . The site of Delphi ...

Delphi Automotive (@DelphiAuto) on Twitter
Log in Sign up You are on Twitter Mobile because you are using an old version of Internet Explorer. Learn more here Delphi Automotive @ DelphiAuto ...

Delphi Connect for Verizon on the App Store on iTunes
Get Delphi Connect for Verizon on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.


Audi working with Delphi to develop autonomous car tech
Audi is developing an iPad-sized device that will pack all the necessary computing power for a self-driving car

US approves China company's acquisition of Delphi biz
The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States has formally approved the acquisition of Delphi's global production of braking systems ...

Verizon And Delphi Officially Launch Vehicle Diagnostics Service - $250 For The Module, $5 A Month On ...
If you're a car nut, a paranoid parent, or a small business owner looking to do a little, uh, company vehicle economy analysis, Verizon's teamed ...

Watch out Google: Delphi gives Ars a ride in its self-driving car
The automotive components maker gave Ars a preview ride around the neighborhood. MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA—On Thursday morning I met with Delphi at its ...

The skinny on Delphi's autonomous road trip across the United States
Filed under: Green , Videos , Autonomous Last week, Delphi's autonomous car became the first to complete a coast-to-coast trip across the United ...

Delphi partners with WiTricity on automated wireless charging system
One could easily argue that parking between the white lines at any local hangout presents a challenge for some inexperienced drivers. So, why ...

Resources last updated: 12/7/2015 3:05:00 PM